Get a Real Job: How to Silence Haters

Putting haters in their place when it comes to “average salary” estimations.

Ever had anyone tell you to quit the salon and “get a real job?” Read this, right before you tell them to shove it.

The BLS (or Bureau of Labor Statistics) maintains a database of statistics where you can find information on the working conditions, training and education requirements, wage data, and expected job prospects for a broad variety of professions–including ours.

Currently, the BLS median pay estimates are as follows:
Barbers, Hairdressers, and Cosmetologists: $23,710 per year.
Manicurists and Pedicurists: $20,820 per year.
Skincare Specialists: $30,090 per year.

For other industries, I’m sure the BLS figures come very close to reality, but not for ours. The averages you’re seeing shouldn’t discourage you from joining this profession and anyone who quotes them to you as accurate is embarrassingly misinformed. I’m going to tell you why.

How the BLS Data is Collected

The Bureau of Labor Statistics will send a “Field Economist” to a selected establishment. These Field Economists contact the business owner and make arrangements to collect information on the following:

Job listing with wage data: This listing includes job titles, paid wages, full- vs. part-time status, union vs nonunion distinctions, dates of hire, and job codes. The listing will include a full breakdown of this information for each individual worker.
Specific job characteristics and work schedules: Field Economists use a “point factor leveling” process that incorporates four occupational factors to determine work level. These factors are knowledge (job requirements), job controls and complexity (how variable are the job tasks and how much flexibility is afforded to workers in how they accomplish those tasks), contacts (who workers have contact with and the nature of that contact), and physical environment (does the job require physical strength, present a hazard, or require specific safety precautions).
Benefit details: Field Economists collect data on benefits like paid leave, insurance, retirement, supplemental pay, etc.

Next, the Field Economist will ask questions for clarification. Once that’s done, they update the data.

The Problems with BLS Data Collection

The BLS only collects data from a sample of firms. There’s no way to know how many “salon firms” report, or how accurate their reporting is. On the BLS’s Survey Methodology page, as it pertains to the National Compensation Survey, “The larger an establishment’s employment, the greater its chance of selection.”

Who are the largest establishments in the professional salon services industry? Regis Corp. and similar corporate chains and franchises.

Why is that a big deal? Regis Corp. and similar corporate chains and franchises don’t represent this backwards industry.

Why don’t Regis or other corporate salons represent the industry? Put simply: they’re managed better.

  • Because corporate salons have teams of lawyers advising them, they don’t do things illegally. They provide benefits and ensure their employees are classified and compensated appropriately.
  • When employees consistently underperform, they’re let go.
  • When client flow slows down, hours are cut back.
  • When an employee is close to hitting overtime, schedule adjustments are made to ensure they don’t so costs won’t rise above acceptable levels and so employees won’t be overworked.
  • New hires aren’t approved unless the metrics justify it.
  • Corporate salons have premium, high-traffic locations and are marketed extensively.

When you compare a corporate salon to a private salon, the differences are vast and their P&Ls reflect that.

The primary area where these differences are glaring is the labor expense. Corporate salons know how to keep those costs beyond manageable. Private salons…well…let’s talk about private salons, shall we?

A Brief Sidenote to Placate Rabid Keyboard Warriors

Before I continue with this post, let me soothe the sensitive souls of the tender flowers out there who falsely believe I’m speaking about all private salon owners. I’m not. I’m aware exceptions exist. If you’re one of them, good for you! Give yourself a pat on the back. Congrats on being a law-abiding, responsible business owner. Instead of attacking me in the comments, revel in your superiority in comparison to the bullet points below.
You good? Great. Let’s continue.

(Delicate Flowers, I hear your cries. “I’m not like that!” you’re shouting at your computer. “My existence refutes the legitimacy of her statements!” you’re yelling. Let me say this one more time: you’re a unicorn, not the norm. The existence of good salon owners doesn’t disprove the existence of staggering numbers of bad salon owners. Need proof of their existence? Read the comments on literally every article on this site. Continuing on…)

Field Economists only collect data from a small subset of employees–not the entire salon–so that further skews the numbers.

With over half of professionals opting for microsalon ownership, accurate performance estimations are impossible.

The odds of independent salon owners (booth/studio renters, home salon operators, etc.) being selected and included in the BLS samples are zero. This is significant, as independent salons now outnumber corporate salons and private salons.

According to the PBA’s Economic Snapshot, in 2012, only 92,157 salon establishments had payroll employees. 1,045,288 salons were non-employer establishments. This is an 83% increase in the non-employer sector over the previous decade. To be sure, with the explosion of the suite rental model, this number has likely increased significantly over the last four years. (Maybe it had a little something to do with all those bad management practices?)

All data is reported by salon owners and salon professionals, rendering it virtually useless.

Even if microsalon owners were included, the data likely couldn’t be relied upon. Like a lot of private salon owners, microsalon owners may not know their numbers or keep great records, and may intentionally underreport their income. False numbers can be given due to lack of knowledge (incorrect records), estimating (lack of records), or outright lying (intentional misrepresentation of income for the purposes of tax evasion).

The best way to gauge performance is to base estimations on verified reported income.

So, if the BLS wanted to do it right (which I’m sure they don’t because it would be insanely time-consuming), they’d obtain the correct data from the IRS and average it across a broad spectrum, evaluating and reporting figures for employee-based salons and microsalons independently.

Additional Factors

If the BLS were to evaluate based on my methodology, they’d still run into two additional factors that would have to be stabilized.

Part-time Participation: Many salon professionals are part-time, so their annual performance would have to be adjusted to compensate for their lack of participation.

Management Variables: The salons and microsalons evaluated would have to demonstrate similar management competency. The performance of a well-managed establishment far exceeds that of one that is mismanaged or not managed whatsoever. When you base salary estimations on averages that include a wide variety of poorly managed establishments with a handful of tightly managed ones, lower averages are inevitable.

The truth is that your salary can vary widely, depending on the salon’s management, your individual professionalism, the compensation system the salon utilizes, and any number of factors.

The numbers the BLS reports are medians, so it’s important to understand what a “median” is, and whose figures are being counted.

To calculate a median number, a range of numbers are added together and the result is divided by the total numbers counted.

Number 1 + Number 2 + Number 3 = Total
Total ÷ 3 (amount of numbers added to create total) = Median

If the first stylist makes $110,000 a year, the second makes $40,000, and the third makes $15,000, the median earnings would be $55,000. If a corporate salon that keeps labor overhead below 35% through strategic scheduling is being compared with other major salon chains who do the same, the figures will reflect that–not the actual earnings across the spectrum of the profession.

Don’t put too much stock into those BLS numbers, or into the opinions of uninformed haters. If you want to start a career in this industry and you’re ready for the insanity that comes along with it, then go for it, but don’t do it for the money.

Do it because it’s what you love doing.

Plan to do it right. Be professional, present yourself well, refuse to accept offers from exploitative salon owners, know your rights, know your worth, and find a mentor. Go out and find yourself a unicorn salon owner or give rental a shot.

This is as real a career as any, so long as you’re treating it like one. If you’re dedicated, you can be successful in this business and make exceptional money. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Source:

Get a Real Job: How to Silence Haters

Beauty – Trends, Tips & Tutorials

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Thanks to all who follow my blog!  If you’re new….stick around.  Every day I post new beauty tutorials, product uses, makeup hacks and lots more beauty, and random, topics:)

I’m trying to organically grow an online beauty directory I started.  I’m just a mom working her butt off so any support or feedback is always welcome.

Have a great day!

Tami

THIS T-SHIRT HAIR-DRYING HACK WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE

If we told you the cure for frizzy, unruly hair is an old T-shirt, we would expect one of the following reactions: an incredulous laugh, a dismissive scoff or a disturbing stare — or all three, in quick succession. We don’t blame you. It’s hard to look at that ratty high school gym class tee and picture it being the hair-taming miracle you’ve been praying for, but today we’re sharing a trick that may just change the hair game forever. All you’ll need is a plain cotton tee.

HERE’S HOW THE T-SHIRT HAIR HACK WORKS

Instead of drying your hair with a towel post-shower, swap it for a T-shirt. Here’s why:

“When hair is wet, it becomes weaker and softer,” explains hairstylist Isabella Vázquez. “If we use a regular towel to dry it, the grooves of the towel become aggressors to the cuticle of the hair. Towels absorb all the moisture from our hair when what we want to do is absorb the excess water without stripping it of the moisture that helps the hair from becoming frizzy.”

So why a cotton shirt, you ask? Vázquez says the T-shirt will absorb excess water while preventing frizz. “Because T-shirts do not have the rough grooves of a towel, the flat surface allows water to sink in and slides over the hair instead of roughing it up.”

Another great alternative to using a T-shirt is trying a microfiber towel. We like the NuMe Microfiber Hair Wrap because it’s lightweight and will give you the same smoothing benefits. This drying method works especially well for curly-haired people who are all too familiar with frizzy-hair fiascos. Unlike thick, fluffy towels, a T-shirt or microfiber towel will dry your strands without disrupting your natural curl pattern.

TUTORIAL: HOW TO WRAP AND DRY YOUR HAIR USING A T-SHIRT

STEP 1: After washing your hair, take a cotton tee and use it to gently wring out any excess water. Then, gather your hair and wrap the T-shirt around it and gently squeeze to sop up the water.

STEP 2: Flip your hair over upside down and pull your hair through the opening of your T-shirt so that the opening stretches around your hairline.

STEP 3: Twist the T-shirt until you reach the end and tuck it underneath the opening at the nape of your neck.

STEP 4: Leave the T-shirt on for 10-15 minutes, undo and style as usual.

Some women prefer to put product into their hair before wrapping it up in a tee. Experiment with it to find the combination that works best for your unique hair type. If you like to style your hair after you shower, run some mousse or styling cream through your strands before twisting it up in the shirt. For nourishing oils or smoothing serums, apply to strands once you’ve let it down from the tee. When your hair has dried, either naturally or by a blow dryer, you should notice how smooth it feels!

Source:

https://www.makeup.com/t-shirt-hair-drying

BEAUTY Q&A: IS SALT WATER BAD FOR YOUR HAIR?

Summer always poses a bit of a challenge when it comes to our hair care. It’s bad enough that humidity is at an all-time high and our hair is in a permanent state of frizz. Don’t get us wrong, we love the season — sans the drying chlorine pools and scalp sunburn — but the next three months can feel like a never-ending battle with your hair. To make matters worse, we’re here to warn you of another summer hair-care aggressor — salt water.

 

We asked George Papanikolas, Matrix Celebrity Hair Colorist, and Biolage Ambassador, to weigh in on just how damaging salt water can be for your hair.

 

“Saltwater can wreak havoc on your hair, so people should absolutely be concerned when taking frequent beach trips this summer,” says Papanikolas. “The salt can leach moisture from your hair leaving it dry and brittle and more prone to breakage and split ends.”

 

If you’ve ever stepped out of the ocean and your skin felt dry and tight, just imagine what the water is doing to your stands. Much like chlorine, salt water can damage hair by drying it out and making it more prone to breakage and knots.

 

With the beach, also comes potential UV exposure from the sun. To protect your hair before splashing in the waves, Papanikolas advises using a product with UV filters. Much like your skin needs protection from the sun at the beach, your hair can benefit from it, too. “Before you go to the beach, products with UV filters like Matrix Total Results Keep Me Vivid Vevetizer hair balm will create a shield protecting the color against sun and heat damage,” he says. As for the salt water, there is a simple hack that can keep damage to a minimum. “Rinsing your hair with fresh water first will keep your hair from soaking up as much salt water and minerals as it acts like a sponge,” Papanikolas adds.

Source:

https://www.makeup.com/how-to-protect-hair-from-salt-water

overnight hairstyle hacks

There’s no greater struggle than having to compose a hairstyle in the morning — especially after snoozing your alarm a shameful number of times and then realizing you have to be out the door ASAP. The good news is that there’s a very efficient way to solve this problem, and it starts right before you go to bed. Ahead, discover five overnight hairstyle hacks from some of our favorite beauty vloggers to help you get yourself out the door faster than you ever imagined.

For Medium-Length Hair

Overnight sock curls are officially a thing and we promise it’s worth testing out. Hair and beauty vlogger Lysss Ryan created the look in the following steps:

STEP 1: Split your hair into two sections and out of those sections, split them into two more. In total, you should have four sections.

STEP 2: Take your first sock and wrap your hair around it, rolling it upwards towards the top of your head.

STEP 3: Tie your hair into a knot. Tie it as tightly as possible and consider bobby pinning the sock if it begins to fall loose.

STEP 4: Repeat the same process with the next three sections.

STEP 5: In the morning, gently roll the socks of your hair.

Optional: Add dry shampoo to your roots to add some volume and rub a small amount of styling cream through the curls.

For Short, Natural Hair

Hair vlogger Jaleesa Moses shares how she wears her natural hair by sleeping in four simple bantu knots:

STEP 1: Split hair into two sections and then split them into two sections again. Secure each section with a hair elastic.

STEP 2: For the two front sections, twist your hair towards the back of your head as high up as possible twisting around the base.

STEP 3: Keep twisting until you can create a mini bun and then tuck the ends very securely.

STEP 4: Secure the knot with a hair elastic. Repeat with the second front hair section.

STEP 5: In the back, bring your hair high up and twist facing towards the front of your head.

STEP 6: Repeat the same process as the front pieces and then secure.

STEP 7: Use a stocking or silk scarf to protect your hair while you sleep.

STEP 8: In the morning, carefully untwist the four knots. Take a comb and tease your hair, paying the most attention to the back of your hair. Finish with hairspray.

 

 

For Medium-Length Thin and Thick Hair

 

Using a normal fabric headband you can create soft, pretty waves overnight. Mimi from Luxy Hair demonstrates the process:

STEP 1: Split your hair into two sections and place two headbands (to keep hairstyle secure) over the top of your hair. If a bump occurs, pull your hair down to ensure that it’s flat.

STEP 2: Spray the area below the headband with a bottle of water to make your hair damp.

STEP 3: Twist the first section of your hair and then wrap this section around the headband – starting behind your ear.

STEP 4: Repeat the same process for the second section of your hair.

STEP 5: Spray the back, wrapped portion of your hair with hairspray before bed.

STEP 6: In the morning, slowly unwrap the two sections, with the headband on. Take the headband off after the curls are out.

STEP 7: Style curls by scrunching waves with a small amount of texturizing cream.

 

For Long, Thin Hair

Hair donuts can be used for more than just perfectly shaped hair buns. Hair vlogger Nee from Bebexo demonstrates how to sleep on a hair donut (or a DIY one using a sock, of course) for voluminous morning curls:

STEP 1: Tie your dry hair into a high ponytail, situating it right above your head.

STEP 2: Using a hair donut or a sock, put your ponytail through the hole as if it were a hair elastic.

STEP 3: Divide your hair into two equal sections (or three or more for more volume).

STEP 4: Put your thumb and index finger through the top of the hole and pull the first section through.

STEP 5: Then repeat the same steps until all of your hair is wrapped around the donut.

STEP 6: Repeat with all of the same sections.

STEP 7:When you get to the tip of the hair, just tuck it under the sock bun.

STEP 8: In the morning, gently unravel the sock and carefully take out the hair elastic.

STEP 9: Apply your favorite hairspray to finish.

For Long, Thick Hair

Here’s how beauty vlogger Vivian V creates a wavy hair look with a twist braid style that is actually cute enough to wear outside of your bedroom:

STEP 1: Starting with slightly damp hair, split your hair into two sections.

STEP 2:Starting with the front layer of your hair, twist one section of hair over the other. After you’ve twisted one section of hair over the other, add more hair to one section and twist it over.

STEP 3: Keep repeating this process until you reach the base of your neck. Make sure you get all of the hair from the back of your head to complete the braid on one side.

STEP 4: When there aren’t any layers left to add, twist the braid into a bun and secure with a hair elastic. Be sure that the bun is very night.

STEP 5: Repeat the same steps for the second section of hair.

STEP 6: The next morning, gently take the twist braids out and use your hands to separate the waves.

Source:

https://www.makeup.com/overnight-hairstyles

Are You Applying Makeup in the Right Order?

There is a natural order to accomplishing most anything in life: Lather, rinse, repeat. Love, marriage, baby in a carriage. High school, college, job (if you’re lucky). But some things, like putting on a fresh face of makeup, are a little more complicated.

What do you do first: Apply lipstick or focus on eyes? Where does blush come in? Can you get away with putting liner on after mascara? We talked with Cristina Bartolucci, NYX’s chief creative director and co-founder of DuWop, who gave us her formula for putting together a perfect face. Of course, not everyone will use all steps, but even if you skip the powder or cheeks, this is still a good working order to follow!

1: Primer or Moisturizer

“Choose one, not both,” Bartolucci says. “Moisturizer, no matter how light in texture, will interfere with the function of a primer.” Also, always remember to get in your sunscreen, whether SPF is built into your primer, moisturizer, or foundation.

2: Foundation

“I do not believe in doing the eyes first to avoid fallout,” Bartolucci says, noting that fallout is bound to happen when you are using eye shadow. ”When the product falls onto bare skin, the pigment can be even harder to remove. It’s better to create a canvas with the foundation and then correct any mistakes as a finishing touch.”

3: Concealer

“Here is where you look at your face with a critical eye and add concealer sparingly,” says Bartolucci. She recommends only on blemishes or dark circles. “You want to wait until after the foundation because foundation will do a lot of the job for you.”

4: Powder

“Set it all with a very light dusting of translucent powder. This will help make it easier to remove fallout from eye shadow and give the base time to settle in while you apply the rest of your makeup.”

5: Eyes or lips

“I like to mix them up,” says Bartolucci. “After the face, I usually do the eyes first, but sometimes I’ll start with the lips because it gives me time to think about what I really want to do on the eyes.”

For Eyes: shadow > liner > then mascara. This is the order Bartolucci follows for applying eye makeup. “But always go back and layer,” she suggests. “Add a little more liner at the lash line, an extra pop of shimmer shadow in the center of the lid, etc.”

For Lips: balm > liner > lipstick > then gloss. Bartolucci suggests smudging liner all over your lips and rubbing it in with fingertips before applying lipstick. And of course, use gloss only if you want!

6: Cheeks

“I do the cheeks last for two reasons. One, it ties the eyes and lips together. Two, if you’re using a powder, you can sweep it across the lids after the eye makeup is done to add an extra pop.”

Top Image Credit: Lóránd Gelner / Vetta

Souce:

https://www.beautylish.com/a/vxiir/makeup-application-tips