13 beauty trends that will dominate in 2020

The beauty movements shaping the new decade

The beauty industry may thrive on newness, but this year a slower approach is on the horizon, with sustainability movements flourishing. The 2020 spirit of beauty is more inclusive than ever, too; from innovations in hyper-personalised products, to the boom of products servicing subjects previously considered taboo. From the ethical to the escapist, theses are the trends to get excited about now…

1. Ageless beauty will be (belatedly) celebrated

In the latter part of the last decade, brands and retailers made significant strides in catering to under-represented communities. “In 2019, Superdrug announced their decision to only stock foundations that come in a minimum of 20 different shades following research revealing that two-thirds of black and Asian women do not feel that high-street brands cater for their beauty needs,” consultant dermatologist Dr Justine Kluk notes of the post-Fenty Beauty era, whereby brands stocking foundation in a small shade range will be called out as archaic. But while products, from make-up to hair and skincare, are more readily available to all ethnicities, body types, skin tones, gender expressions and identities, beauty industry marketing is still often guilty of assuming their customer is white – and young.

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Indeed, age inclusion in particular has felt somewhat lacking from the diversity conversation in beauty; 40 per cent of women over the age of 50 ‘don’t feel seen’ according to L’Oreal Paris research (the brand itself has a rich history of speaking to women over 40, with ‘ageless’ messaging and mature beauty ambassadors). But that looks set to change across the board, with brands now speaking directly to the neglected Generation X woman (aged 45 and up). In a further move away from ‘anti-ageing’ towards those servicing specific concerns – often targeting hormonally-driven changes (menopausal women represent a large and lucrative category but have been significantly underserved until recently), brands are introducing more products for Gen Xers. Look out for new launches in 2020 from L’Oreal ParisClarinsTrinny LondonKorres and Boots No7.

2. Conscious capitalism and consumption: from ‘slow beauty’ to ‘blue beauty’

The ever-increasing focus on conscious capitalism has seen beauty giants such as L’Oréal publicly commit to 100 per cent eco-friendly packaging (meaning compostable or reusable) by 2025, while British brand Lush (among other indie brands) has pioneered the movement for zero packaging (‘naked’, as they call it) by successfully making products in solid form. Waterless beauty has also become a focus: in 2019 L’Oréal achieved a 60 per cent reduction in water consumption per finished product, while Unilever halved the water associated with the consumer use of its products. This year, a new Procter & Gamble hair line called Waterless will launch in the US. As the industry’s most-used ingredient, there are concerns that demand for water could outstrip supply if these changes aren’t made.

When it comes to conscious consumption, a collective slow (or slower) beauty stance will be adopted, with respect to sustainability and environmental ethics. So coined ‘blue beauty’ will rise, too. The concept referring to products that aim to protect the oceans and water supplies (such as One Ocean Beauty, which partners with charity Oceana) is the “next generation clean beauty”, according to WWD. The new decade is essential to the wellbeing of our planet, and the beauty industry can play a big part in that.

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3. Microbiome skincare will become increasingly sophisticated

Google searches for ‘microbiome’ (the microorganisms on and inside your body) increased by +110 per cent year-on-year in 2019, and – according to Mintel – it’s this that is driving the UK facial skincare market. “There are a trillion microorganisms on the surface of your skin and not one of us on the planet has the same microbiome,” says skincare authority Paula Begoun. Hence why it is a challenge for bacteria-balancing ingredients in products to suit all. But a move towards hyper-personalised skincare will factor in one’s microbiome, with beauty giants such as Johnson & Johnson having a dedicated microbiome platform working on it. Dendy Engelman M.D., consulting dermatologist at Elizabeth Arden (too focusing on this sector) confirms, “the microbiome will be on the forefront in 2020,” in a bid to tackle all – from ageing concerns to acne. Maintaining bacterial homeostasis on your skin means it “reflects the light better, keeps hydration in and lets products penetrate deeper,” she adds. Yes please.

4. A hyper-personalised approach awaits

Taking skin swabs to test bacterial analysis and DNA – and therefore receive products customised to your microbiome and genetic make-up – are just two ways in which we will be taking a more targeted approach to beauty in the new decade. Home tech can also help tell us about our beauty needs. HiMirror analyses your skin’s conditions through a photo, storing data to track progress over time and reveal whether your products actually work for you. Like an at-home skincare consultant, it can assess your skin for lines and wrinkles, dark circles, dark spots, blemishes, roughness and pore size. When it comes to make-up, Procter & Gamble will launch its Opte Precision Wand in 2020, which identifies skin imperfections and applies make-up to those exact area without wasting product on places that don’t require coverage. No, it’s not wizardry. For your hair, Sisley has developed its Hair Rituel Analyser, a tool providing an accurate and customised diagnosis of the scalp and hair fibre, allowing you to better bespoke your routine and track progress.

5. Beauty and mental health conversations will further converge

The microbiome is one example of just how much the health and beauty worlds have merged, as are both the boom of vegan beauty and the CBD market being bigger than ever, which all speaks to a holistic approach to beauty becoming the norm. When it comes to wellness, with Google searches for ‘self-care’ having risen by 100 per cent in the last five years, the normalisation of conversations around mental health has been one of the biggest cultural phenomena of the last decade. In 2020, we predict that mental health will become a bigger focus for beauty brands, especially directed towards millennials (dubbed ‘the anxious generation’) and Gen Zers (who are “more likely to report mental health concerns“). Fashionistadetails that according to a 2019 report on Gen Z’s beauty shopping habits compiled by WGSN, “Gen Z prizes brands that offer moments of calm, sensorial experiences and products that support their physical, mental and emotional well-being”. Think Revlon’s recent collaboration with model and activist Adwoa Aboah’s mental health organisation Gurls Talk. It’s also likely as to why the ‘Mindful Mani’–the idea of plugging into music/a podcast while you have your nails transformed – launched by the UK’s leading beauty bookings service Treatwell – was such a success during 2019’s Mental Health Awareness Month: the platform reached over 20 million people across eight countries in a bid to make salon time specifically ‘me-time’. Alongside manicures (inhibiting your ability to swipe, scroll and tap), Treatwell also reports a 40 per cent increase in massage bookings year-on-year, suggesting we’re spending more on our self-care and making moments of disconnect a priority.

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6. Anti-pollution skincare will become as commonplace as sun protection

Latest figures show that 91 per cent of the world’s population live in places where air quality exceeds the World Health Organisation’s guideline limits and 4.2 million deaths every year occur as a result of exposure to ambient (outdoor) air pollution. “This is double previous estimates and places air pollution as the world’s largest single environmental health risk,” notes Dr Kluk. “Our skin is the main interface between our bodies and pollutants from road traffic, power generation, agricultural/waste incineration and industry,” the dermatologist adds. The result? “Features of skin ageing, such as wrinkles and dark spot formation, are accelerated in heavily polluted environments and the number of those suffering with skin conditions, such as acne, is increased.” So, if sun exposure is our skin’s number one enemy, pollution is the number two. Anti-pollution skincare is no longer thought of as marketing, but a must. In 2019 Liberty London saw an increase of 57 per cent in purchases of pollution-battling products, and skincare launches will focus on it in 2020 (for example, Clé de Peau Beauté will be relaunching its global best-seller – the Correcting Cream Veil –with pollution defence, SPF and super light reflecting technology). “I predict that the demand for skincare products with an anti-pollution claim will soar in the coming year and they will become as commonplace in our daily routines as sun protection creams,” says Dr Kluk.

7. Calls for ‘clean beauty’ to be defined with full transparency

In 2019 ‘clean beauty’ gathered momentum to become a mega-category, but no one could actually agree on what defined it. Was it what was in the formulas? Or what wasn’t? Is ‘clean’ the same as ‘green’ and ‘natural’ (also open to interpretation)? What about organic? Many brands saw a new marketing opportunity and jumped on the bandwagon, causing a tide of greenwashing in the wake. Inaccuracies became commonplace online, whereby ‘chemical’ products were labelled ‘bad’ – despite every ingredient (both synthetic and from nature) being a chemical. An EU regulation change came into place the summer of 2019 applying to ‘free-from’ claims such as ‘free-from parabens/silicones’, because, in many cases, there has been no justification for their use. As the CTPA (Cosmetic, Toiletry, and Perfumery Association) explains: “Ultimately, consumers could be led to think that a cosmetic product featuring certain ‘free from’ claims is safer than another product that doesn’t have those claims, which cannot be true.”

In 2020 expect to see a fight against misleading information in beauty with demand for full transparency from brands, leading to clearer definitions of what can be considered ‘clean’. In addition to ingredients, companies’ ethical standards at all stages of a product’s process will be scrutinised. This year, look out for brands such as HIGHR, a new cosmetics company launching with high-impact lipsticks, which hopes to create “the cleanest supply chain in beauty”.

8. We’ll adopt a ‘skinimalist’ approach

This time last year ‘skip-care’ entered our lexicon, a Korean trend surpassing the laborious 10-step routine and encouraging a more minimalist approach, often utilising multi-use products. It took off here: in August statistics from Mintel showed that 28 per cent of UK women have reduced the number of products in their skincare routine, with millennials aged 20 to 29 being most likely to have simplified their routines, with 54 per cent confirming so. Before long we were ‘skin fasting’ (popularised by Japanese skincare brand Mirai Clinical), which played into many a modern movement. For some it was about the aforementioned slow beauty – the counter trend to excessive consumption of products born out of respect for our sustainability crisis (naturally, this is not restricted to skincare, but beauty buys in general). For others it was more wellness-related – like an intermittent fasting diet, it’s thought to help the skin ‘detox’. Of course, skincare companies are identifying new topical ways to encourage a ‘reset’, with autophagy in skincare being a new trend predicted by Elizabeth Arden’s Dr Engelman. She explains: “Autophagy simply means self-eating, a process that every cell in your body goes through. Processed foods and environmental toxins can slow autophagy down so, to combat that, you can activate the process through certain foods (think antioxidant-rich teas) and different eating habits, like intermittent fasting.” And, she adds, there will new ingredients formulated in products which will act as autophagy activators.

Whether you strip back your skincare, or look for clever innovations to make the skin behave more efficiently, it’s clear that with a ‘skinimalist’ approach, simple needn’t mean ineffective. If a more minimalist lifestyle applies to your product habit, but you don’t want to sacrifice on results, look to brands such as Tandem Skincare. The collection of hardworking hybrid products are designed to simplify your routine while reducing your consumption.

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9. Gen Zers will practice prejuvination

While taking a conscious approach (as above), Dr Kluk feels that Gen Zers will also be increasingly skincare savvy, adopting serious routines earlier. “If you care about your skin, it’s never too early to take an active interest in skin health,” she says. “Skincare has evolved past rejuvenation and ‘fixing’ to prevention and prejuvenation.” She explains that, while there is no right age to establish a routine appropriate for your skin type, the importance of healthy bodies is stressed to younger people through conversations about diet and exercise, so habits that keep your skin healthy should not be an exception. “Gen Z – the youngest and soon the largest, consumer population – understand this very well. Learning to cleanse, moisturise and protect your skin at an early age can improve self-esteem, relationships and professional development, reduce suffering and help us feel good about our skin for as long as possible.” Subsequently, she predicts “that the skincare offering directed at this knowledge thirsty, digitally savvy, eco-conscious population will explode in 2020 and beyond”. Actress Millie Bobby Brown’s beauty brand Florence by Mills (pictured above) is a prime example of this; having recently wonSpecialty Launch of the Year at the WWD Beauty Inc Awards it balances prejuvination with playful perfectly.

10. Make-believe make-up will go mainstream

Sales of make-up were in decline in 2019, with 31 per cent of us who wear it buying colour cosmetics less frequently compared to 2018, and while modest consumption may continue, 2020 looks set to be the year of a return to make-up experimentation. Popularised by HBO’s hit series Euphoria, and seen on the spring/summer 2019 catwalks including Anna Sui, Dries Van Noten, Off-White and House of Holland (above), make-believe make-up feels very now. “2020 is the year to experiment and play with your make-up and your style,” says influential make-up artist Lisa Potter-Dixon. But, she qualifies, “this doesn’t mean that you have to cover your face in gems and neon eyeshadow,” like a model tended to backstage by Pat McGrath. “Placing a touch of glitter in the centre of your eye, under your lower lash line, will give you a subtle twinkle of sparkle,” she advises. “Use a liquid glitter like Stila’s Magnificent Metals, or, if you’re feeling adventurous, Gypsy Shrine do some lovely self-adhesive gem stones.” For day, try a coloured liner instead of your usual black. “Jewel-toned shades work on all skin tones and can bring out your natural eye colour,” Potter-Dixon adds. The same goes for hair: pearls and crystals adorned ‘dos on the spring catwalks, while models at Moschino walked with their hair painted in pastel patterns. From the otherworldly to the wearable, playful beauty may just be the perfect antidote to our politically unsettled times.

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11. Post-influencer beauty brands will shine

If MyBeautyBrand has anything to do with it, the ‘#spon’-heavy beauty industry will be disrupted in 2020. The digital platform whereby customers – not influencers – sell via peer-to-peer recommendation (like a digital Avon) just launched and has high hopes of encouraging companies to stop paying influencers to promote beauty products. Co-founder Robin Derrick tells Bazaar: “Big brands have jumped on influencer marketing as a way to reach people that are increasingly turning off traditional media – it’s cynical and lazy marketing.” MyBeautyBrand don’t have any problem with influencers as such, or someone endorsing something, but “it’s easy to corrupt that process with money,” Derrick adds. He feels that in 2020, transparency and honesty are more important. Of course, this comes while Instagram tests the removal of likes from its platform, leaving influencers to fight for attention, validate themselves – and make money. Whether brands will move on from sponsored content – or influencers will turn their back on Instagram to promote products in other ways – remains to be seen, but either way authenticity will reign.

12. A men’s beauty boom is coming

A visit to the Indie Beauty Expo London 2019 in October demonstrated that beauty brands specifically for men (not ‘gender neutral’) are on the up. The company helping indie brands connect to buyers, press, vendors and investors reports: “Brands are multiplying to cater to evolving notions of masculinity and capitalise on an accelerating men’s personal care business. Allied Market Research forecasts the global men’s personal care market will advance at a compound annual growth rate of 5.5 per cent to reach $166 billion by 2022.”

Ones to watch are BEYL Made for Men Skincare, Shakeup Cosmetics and Mr. Carter’s Essentials which will be joining the likes of Warpaint, whose goal is to break down male make-up misconceptions and provide functional products. With Tom FordYSL and Clinique successfully selling concealers, bronzers and brow definers for men, hopefully 2020 will be the year that men wearing make-up as they please will become the accepted norm.

13. The sexual wellness movement will continue to grow

As we all become more at ease discussing subjects previously thought of as taboo, the market for personal care grows bigger and bigger. While so-called ‘vaginal beauty products’ may miss the mark, brands now catering to our sexual health and wellness – whether in the context of pregnancy and menopause, or not – can only be a good thing. The Indie Beauty Expo London 2019 showcased many emerging brands focusing on this area, from Smile Makers (arguably the first sex-tech brand created by and for women) to Organicup (organic menstrual cups and cleansers) and Baubo (intimate skincare balms). With the global sexual wellness market predicted to reach a value of $39 billion by 2024, this inclusive sector is seeing many brands approach it from a more sophisticated standpoint, too. Recently, Marylebone’s The Drug Store (“the home of CBD curated wellness”) launched its Tackling Taboos seminar series, with the first instalment spotlighting the subject of sexual wellness. Expect more conversations – and innovations – around the subject in 2020.

Source: https://www.harpersbazaar.com/uk/beauty/beauty-shows-trends/a30279675/2020-beauty-trends/

Breaking Beauty News: Milk Makeup, Coloured Raine, & More!

Keeping up with all the new beauty products dropping each week could be a full-time job! Luckily, we’ve assembled a list of some of this week’s new beauty products you might want to add to your cart. Read to the end to see which made the cut as my top pick.

1. Milk Makeup’s Vegan Milk Moisturizer is a rich face cream featuring a blend of vegan milks for daily hydration.

2. Single shadow collectors rejoice! Coloured Raine has released the Book of Shades Eyeshadow Organizer, an empty single eyeshadow book that can hold up to 72 shadows.

3. Laneige’s Cica Sleeping Mask strengthens skin’s moisture barrier overnight for nourished skin when you wake up.

4. Fenty Beauty has released mini Snap Shadows Mix & Match Eyeshadow Palettes in 6 color schemes from neutrals to pastels.

5. Want full coverage, 16-hour wear? The Elf Hydrating Camo Concealer delivers a matte finish and comes in 26 shades, including a true white.

6. Tarte Spicy Betch takes “warm-toned palette” to a new level, with 8 red-, orange-, and yellow-toned shades.

7. The newest release from Beauty Blender, the Wave Shadeshifter Makeup Sponge, transforms to a new color when wet with hot water.

8. The Estee Lauder Futurist Hydrating Rescue Moisturizing Foundation SPF 45 is a full coverage foundation with a radiant finish plus sun protection to boot.

9. Obianuju’s Top Pick: Juvia’s Place just launched mini palettes, and they are gorgeous! There are 4 palettes in this collection: The ChocolatesThe NudesThe Violets, and my personal favorite, The Berries.

 

Source:  https://www.rouge18.com/2019/12/26/breaking-beauty-news-milk-makeup-coloured-raine-more/

 

It Shouldn’t Be This Hard for a Woman in a Wheelchair to Get a Pedicure

Federal laws prohibit businesses from discriminating against disabilities, and yet stories are still going viral about differently abled women being denied service at nail salons. How is this happening? Writer Madison Lawson investigates.

Early last week a screenshot of a Yelp review for a nail salon started surfacing on Facebook. In the post, a woman from St. Peters, Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis, wrote about the shock and frustration she felt when a salon manager turned her daughter Beth away from getting a pedicure. The reason, Mintner claimed: because Beth was in a wheelchair.

Like Beth, I live in suburban Missouri, I use a wheelchair, and I enjoy getting my nails done. I also understand that the fairly uneventful experience is uniquely different when you have a disability. It doesn’t change the way kicking back in a massage chair makes you feel—that’s still heaven—but when you’re unsure about how willing a salon will be to accommodate you, something as relaxing as a spa day can be the source of stress and anxiety.

As Dorothy Mintner, Beth’s mother, wrote in her now viral post, “I brought my daughter, who is disabled and in a wheelchair, to get a pedicure and manicure, and we were turned away. We were told they don’t do people like her.” She went on to explain that, despite the fact that both she and Beth’s friend offered to help Beth into a pedicure chair, the manager still refused service.

“I said, ‘I’m sorry—what?'” Mintner tells Glamour of the situation. “She said, ‘We don’t take people like her,’ to which I asked, ‘What do you mean?'” According to Mintner, there was a language barrier between her and the manager, who said they didn’t know what was “wrong” with Beth and kept repeating that they could not accommodate her. “At that point, I just really needed to leave,” says Mintner. “I was too upset. And you could tell Beth was very upset.”

Mintner says the ordeal was particularly painful because it was her first time taking Beth to get a pedicure in seven years, when Beth was in an accident that left her with a traumatic brain injury. Now Beth is nonverbal.

The salon manager (who is also part owner) of Q Nails spoke to local news station KSDK and admitted she denied Beth service due to fear of hurting her. Glamour reached out to the salon manager who, at press time, had not responded to a request for comment for this story.

The issue could also be a violation of Title III of the Americans With Disabilities Act, which prohibits discrimination from “activities” or “places of public accommodations” on the basis of disability. Mintner says she is now taking her case to the Missouri Commission on Human Rights, which can issue penalties against the salon, if they decide to take and rule on the case. According to KSDK, the penalties usually aren’t financial; rather, they could require the salon to retrain its staff or create new business policies.

The first time I went to Cierra, she asked me how I sit most comfortably. I told her the situation with my arms, and she brought her entire kit up to me so she could do my acrylics on the tray table of my wheelchair. I felt like everybody else in the salon. We spent our time gossiping about the Kardashians and our favorite trends. Now when I go in for an appointment, I don’t even think about the fact that I’m in a wheelchair because it’s not relevant. I’m just another paying customer.

You might be reading this as an able-bodied person thinking, How can I do anything to help? Recognize that people with disabilities make up the single minority that anybody could potentially become a part of at any point in their life. Seven years ago, before her accident, Beth walked into any salon she chose. She should be able to roll into any salon she wants to now.

Madison Lawson is a writer based in Columbia, Missouri. Follow her @wheelchairbarbie.

Source:

https://www.glamour.com/story/wheelchair-nail-salon-discrimination

 

HOW to APPLY LIQUID EYELINER WITH LASH EXTENSIONS

Cat-eye devotees understand how important liquid eyeliner is to one’s makeup routine. If you identify with this sentiment, then you probably have at least five liquid liners in your makeup collection at all times, and it’s the part of your routine you just hate to go without. If you also have eyelash extensions, you might find your life to be particularly difficult and maybe even messy. Because there’s nothing worse than destroying your expensive extensions, we reached out to lash expert Skyy Hadley and a few of our favorite beauty influencers for advice.

Avoid Waterproof Liners

“First rule is no waterproof liquid eyeliner,” says Hadley. “Smudge-proof and budge-proof eye makeup is generally bad news for lash extensions. This includes water-resistant or waterproof liquid liner. A liquid liner may seem innocent enough, but its long-wearing formula will require rubbing or repeatedly touching your lashes to remove it, all of which will shorten your extensions.” Instead, she suggests using a powder liner or an oil-free formula. Our oil-free formula of choice is Maybelline New York Eye Studio Lasting Drama Gel Eyeliner.

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Less Is More

“When wearing lash extensions, it’s important to remember that less is more! Avoid long-lasting formulas, which may require more rubbing when removing, Wearers should be careful when using eyeliner, because if removed improperly it can cause buildup around the lashes,” explains Ashley Hall.

Apply Gently

“Be careful to not run the eyeliner too hard against lashes, or they could loosen and fall out,” says Julia Salvia. Use a formula that easily glides on without pressing too hard, like IT Cosmetics Superhero Liner.

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Don’t Tug on Your Eye

“If you’re used to tugging at your eyelid in order to put on eyeliner, try to break that habit ASAP,” says Miranda Mendelson. “Be sure you’re applying the liner around the extensions and not through them, and remember that you might not need as much as you’re used to since the extensions will already create the illusion of a darker lash line.”


Consider Replacing Your Eyeliner With Eyeshadow

“I would recommend using an eyeshadow to line the eye rather than a traditional eyeliner when wearing lash extensions,” says Madison Murrell. “Wet the shadow before using to make the product stick to the lash line longer. Using a gel or liquid liner is harder to remove than an eyeshadow. Swiping back and forth on the lash line to remove will cause friction on the lash extension, which will cause them to fall off. One easy swipe and the eyeshadow that you used in place of liner will be gone, and you will be left with more lashes!” Heidi Guttenberg agrees: “This is a great alternative and if done with super pigmented product, it can look almost the same as any other eyeliner.”

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Source:

https://www.makeup.com/beauty-question-liquid-eyeliner-lash-extensions

WHAT MAKES LIPSTICK “SWEAT”?

We’ve all been there: It’s a scorching hot summer day at the beach and you open your makeup bag to find your lipstick covered in what looks like little beads of water. “Um, is my lipstick sweating?” you wonder. While your lipstick may seem to be comically mimicking your life at that very moment, we wanted to investigate what’s really happening to the product in these circumstances. Ahead, we spoke with L’Oréal Associate Principal Chemist Roselin Rosario about what lipstick sweat really is and whether you should be concerned about it.

What Causes Lipsticks to Sweat?

Contrary to what we thought, those little drops surrounding your bullet are not water at all. “The sweating observed in lipsticks is most likely oils from the formula slowly coming out,” says Rosario. When oils or waxes in the formula are partially compatible or not compatible, Rosario says that they will start to separate over time. A drastic change in climate may, however, bring these conditions on sooner. “The waxes require high temperature to become mobile,” she says, “but the oils do not because their physical state is liquid, which is why we see droplets coming out of the surface.” If a lipstick is prone to sweating, it will continue to do so as it ages or when it’s exposed to heat.

Are Certain Lipsticks More Likely to Sweat Than Others?

It’s difficult to tell which lipsticks might have a stronger tendency to sweat “It all comes down to the compatibility of all the components in the formula,” says Rosario. “Even a very small change in the formula can make a lipstick more disposed to sweat,.”

You Should, However, Avoid Hot Temps

Although lipsticks are built to withstand temperatures around 50°C or 122°F, it’s important to pay attention to the formula when it’s kept in high heat. “Not only can high temperature soften or melt waxes, if there are any volatile ingredients — those that might vaporize at room temperature — they will be removed from the formula, therefore changing its properties and performance,” says Rosario.

It’s also important to note that every wax has its own distinct melting temperature, and should it go beyond that degree, it will lose its shape. You can pour this melted lipstick into a container and refrigerate it back to a solid form, but Rosario notes that it will most likely not perform the same as the initial lipstick.

So, Should You Be Concerned about Lipstick Sweat?

According to Rosario, you don’t need to be worried about lipstick sweat, but you may want to pay attention to it. “If the extent of the sweating is small, the lipstick composition is only slightly changed, and you will not see any differences when you use it,” says Rosario. If the sweating seems to be extensive or there are other changes in the product — like the texture or color — Rosario’s best advice is to replace it. “Keep track of the age of your lipstick. A fresh lipstick will have a much better performance than one that’s several years old.”

Source:

https://www.makeup.com/why-does-lipstick-sweat