15 Genius New Inventions That Make the World a Better Place

My personal passion is creating new inventions & business platforms that benefit society in a positive way.  This is a fun article on inventions that have made our world a better place.

Inspiring Inventions:

They say necessity is the mother of invention – that the primary driving force for all new creations is some sort of need. Each of these 15 brilliant new inventions answers a different human need – such as clean water or sanitation – or an environmental necessity. To make them, gifted designers identified an important issue, came up with an innovative solution – and then put the wheels in motion to create some truly inspirational inventions.

1. THE DINING SET FOR DEMENTIA PATIENTS

Eatwell is an 8-piece dining set that fosters mealtime independence for sufferers of dementia. The bowls have slanted bottoms for easy scooping and bright blue interiors to help users easily identify food. The spoons hug the side of the dinnerware making collecting food easier and preventing spillage, and all handles allow for easy gripping and stability.

The Eatwell dining set is a genius new invention

The Eatwell dining set gives dementia patients dignity while they eat

2. THE STRAW THAT FILTERS WATER

The LifeStraw filters out virtually all microbiological contaminants to make water safe to drink. The invention was designed to help people in developing countries who don’t have access to safe water and in emergency scenarios following natural disasters when water is contaminated.

The LifeStraw is a genius new invention

The LifeStraw in action (Facebook)

3. THE INVISIBLE BIKE HELMET

Designed by two Swedish students, Hövding is a stylish neck collar that contains an airbag helmet that inflates in the case of an accident. The new invention is available in select stores in Europe – and no doubt we’ll be “seeing” more of Hövding in the near future.

Hövding is a genius new invention

Hövding: Before and after (Niklas Carlsson)

4. THE PATCH THAT MAKES YOU INVISIBLE TO MOSQUITOES

Kite Patch keeps mosquitoes at bay for up to 48 hours, by blocking the insects’ ability to smell carbon dioxide in human exhalation. The sticker-like patch affixes to clothing, and helps to stop the spread of diseases such as malaria, West Nile Virus and Dengue Fever.

The Kite patch is a genius new invention

Kite saves lives. It’s that simple.

5. THE DRINKABLE BOOK

This book is genius: along with providing basic information on clean water, each page of the Drinkable Book is coated with silver nanoparticles, which kill 99.9% of bacteria when water passes through. The result: clean, safe drinking water. Once a page of the book has been torn out, it can be used multiple times as a filter, providing up to 30 days of clean water for one person.

The Drinkable Book is a genius new invention - non-fiction innovation

The Drinkable Book is non-fiction innovation

6. THE FLATPACK REFUGEE SHELTER

Developed in coordination between the IKEA Foundation and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the Better Shelter is a refugee shelter that combines form, function and sustainability. Unlike the traditionally-used tents, the shelters can last up to three years and are fitted with solar panels, mosquito nets, lights, and ventilation and a lockable door for privacy and safety.

The Better Shelter is a genius new invention

Better Shelters assembled in the Karatepe transit camp, Mytilini, Greece (Facebook)

 

7. THE TINY DISPOSABLE PHONE BATTERY

The Mini Power is the eco-answer to keeping mobile phones charged and ready to go. Still in the design phase, these tiny cardboard capsules come in three sizes – two, four and six hours – and can be recycled after use. Designer Tsung Chih-Hsien envisions the new invention being sold at convenience stores, individually and also in bulk perforated sheets.

The Mini Power is a genius new invention

Disposable phone batteries made from cardboard – what’ll they think of next?

8. THE APP THAT LETS YOU LEND YOUR EYES TO THE BLIND

Be My Eyes is a mobile app that connects blind people who need assistance with sighted volunteers who want to help out via a direct video connection. Blind people get help navigating the world around them, sighted people get a helper’s high, and technology is used for a perfectly positive purpose.

Be My Eyes is a genius new invention

Be My Eyes is mobile technology at its best

9. THE FLOATING RUBBISH BIN THAT CLEANS THE OCEANS

Seabin is an automated marina rubbish bin that collects floating rubbish, debris and oil, 24/7. The new invention aims to help solve and prevent ocean pollution by replacing the “trash boats” that currently serve marinas around the world.

The Seabin is a genius new invention

Australian surfers Andrew Turton and Pete Ceglinski with their masterpiece – the Seabin (Indiegogo)

10. THE FURRY ROBOT THERAPIST

Paro the robot seal is equipped with five different sensors that enhance its ability to connect with and heal people. The fluffy robot has a moveable body, makes cute seal sounds and responds to the touch and voice of individuals, adapting its behavior to suit users – which include the elderly, trauma victims and people dealing with serious illnesses.

Paro is a genius new invention

This Japanese invention is becoming a friendly fixture at senior citizens homes in the US and Europe

11. THE SOCCER BALL THAT GENERATES ELECTRICITY

SOCCKET is a portable, power-generating soccer ball designed to promote physical activity and spread awareness about the global energy issue. This new invention gets charged up during normal game play, to power its energy efficient, 3-LED lamp. Even better: for every ball purchased, SOCCKET gives one ball to a child in the developing world.

SOCCKET is a genius new invention

SOCCKET is all about energy – physical and global

12. THE KIT THAT MAKES MENSTRUATION SAFER

Flo is an easy-to-use, cost-effective kit for cleaning and storing reusable sanitary pads, that aims to boost hygiene in parts of the world where menstruation is stigmatized and pads and tampons aren’t always readily available. The new invention consists of a simple spinning and cleaning gadget, a mini-clothes line and a zippered pouch for transport.

Flo is a genius new invention

Leave it to college students to find an easy-to-use, cost-effective tool to help those in need

13. THE EDIBLE WATER BOTTLE YOU CAN MAKE AT HOME

Ooho! is a new kind of packaging made from seaweed that proposes an alternative to plastic bottles. The H20 orbs are servings of water encased in an algae-based gel, which in due time could be a common replacement for the bottles we use every day.

Ooho! is a genius new invention

Ooho! is a creative and green solution to discarding plastic water bottles

14. THE BUS THAT RUNS ON HUMAN WASTE

Waste treatment company GENeco has come up with a groundbreaking new invention – the trash and sewage-guzzling BioBus. The first BioBus is currently active in the United Kingdom, shuttling passengers back and forth every day from Bristol Airport.

The BioBus is a genius new invention

The BioBus: Fueled by purified waste (Wessex Water)

15. THE HAND-POWERED DISHWASHER

Created by Israeli designer Chen Levin, the Circo dishwasher is an off-the-grid, on-the-counter dishwasher that uses zero electricity and only a small amount of water. The concept is simple and brilliant: the hand-powered crank releases a jet of water, which is heated by a sodium acetate tablet. One minute later, the dishes are clean.

The Circo is a genius new invention

With the crank of a handle, the Circo dishwasher cleans dishes within a minute (inhabitat)

Source:

https://www.goodnet.org/articles/15-genius-new-inventions-that-make-world-better-place

How 30 Days of Kindness Made Me a Better Person

I came across this article and found it very inspiring.  I hope you do as well.  If you didn’t know, I have a FB group, Lead with deed, where people can share random acts of kindness and inspirational articles.  I’d love to hear your stories!

30 Days of Kindness:

How 30 Days of Kindness Made Me a Better Person

I don’t know his name, but his messy, shoulder-length hair hides a pair of hauntingly blue eyes. It’s a warm September day in New York, but he’s sitting under a mountain of ragged bits of clothing, towels and blankets. In one hand, he loosely holds a piece of string attached to the neck of a small, mangy-looking dog lying next to him. In the other hand, he clutches a nearly empty bottle of cheap vodka. His bright eyes briefly glance at me without recognition or focus. I don’t know what makes me pause.

My initial thought is to give him money, though I just avoided eye contact with the last 10 people, sputtering that I didn’t have any. And my mom’s words come to mind: “He’ll only spend it on drugs or alcohol.” So I turn to the closest Nathan’s stand and buy him a hot dog, chips and soda.

When I approach him, I feel awkward, my donation insignificant. As if I’m offering a glass of water to a man trapped in a burning building. Is he more of a ketchup or mustard guy? The absurd thought turns my face hot. What comfort will a nutritionally deficient meal with a side of dehydration be to a man who sleeps on cement and spends a life generally invisible to the world?

But when he sees my outstretched hands, he smiles, dropping the bottle and leash to accept the meal with shaky fingers. We don’t exchange any words, but his smile lingers with me.

Can random acts of kindness actually increase and sustain happiness?

It’s only the sixth day of my month-long challenge to find the joy in making someone’s day every day, and up until now, I had felt like a failure. It wasn’t for lack of trying, but rather questioning whether seemingly small gestures were actually accomplishing my goal. Can I really find joy by giving to those around me? Can random acts of kindness actually increase and sustain happiness?

How 30 Days of Kindness Made Me a Better Person

Turns out they can, but there are exceptions. To find lasting happiness through generosity requires a suppression of our ego, an analysis of our motives and a reflection on how these acts alter our perception of the world.

How Generosity Benefits Us

As children, our parents tell us to make up for misbehaving by doing something nice for someone. As adults, we help friends move into a new house; we bring hot meals to new mothers; we might even donate time or money to local charities a few times a year. After all, it’s naturally uncomfortable to see a friend (or stranger) suffering or in need. Call it karma or mojo, but these acts are generally reciprocated. We receive tax breaks, returned meals and favors, thank-you notes. Tit for tat.

But what about pure, altruistic generosity, without the expectation of receiving something in return? Some researchers argue this type of generosity doesn’t exist. But I set out to see whether I could learn to give without the promise of getting. I made lists of various kind acts and placed reminders on my bathroom mirror, my work computer, my car dashboard: Make someone’s day today!

My first act of kindness was buying coffee for the woman behind me in the drive-thru lane at Starbucks. In fact, my first few acts were buying something for someone—lunch for an old friend, a copy of my favorite book to a stranger—but they didn’t make me feel much of anything. The recipients were grateful, but was I really making their day, and was that really boosting my happiness?

How 30 Days of Kindness Made Me a Better Person

At the end of each day, I reflected how being kind made me feel. I dug for tangible proof of my growth. Some days felt more significant: buying cough syrup for the two coughing boys in pajamas at the pharmacy, for example. Their father, who had dark circles under his eyes, rubbed the bridge of his nose as his credit card was declined a second time. I couldn’t tell whether he was more embarrassed or grateful, but I like to think he slept a little easier that night, and I left the pharmacy feeling pretty good.

How 30 Days of Kindness Made Me a Better Person

Countless studies tout the physical, mental and social benefits of receiving generosity. But until the 1980s, the effects on the giver were relatively unknown. Sonja Lyubomirsky, Ph.D., a psychology professor at UC Riverside and a leading happiness researcher, conducted a study in 2004 to determine whether committing five random acts of kindness would increase positive emotions. The short-term study revealed promising results with heightened levels of positive emotions, particularly in the participants who carried out all five acts of kindness on the same day. Spreading the acts over a week, Lyubomirsky theorized, led to a repetitive and often unoriginal pattern that either didn’t change the level of positive emotions or, in some cases, even lowered it.

Admittedly I experienced some form of generosity fatigue around the second week of my challenge. It’s easy to float through the day wrapped up in our own heads, focusing only on what directly impacts us. Consciously searching for new and different ways to improve someone else’s day was more difficult than I had anticipated. We just don’t face that challenge often in society. But then when I did the nice deed, I nearly always felt a boost of happiness afterward. A 2009 study by social psychologist Jorge A. Barraza, Ph.D., and neuroscientist Paul J. Zak, Ph.D., attributes this to a release of oxytocin, the feel-good chemical in the brain.

According to the study, when people feel empathetic, they release 47 percent more oxytocin into their hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for emotion and memory. The participants felt the urge to act generously—particularly toward strangers. As Matthieu Ricard, Ph.D., a Buddhist monk and best-selling author, writes in Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life’s Most Important Skill: “When we are happy, the feeling of self-importance is diminished and we are more open to others.” Studies show people who have experienced a positive event in the past hour are more likely to help strangers in need. This explains why we help people, even at a cost to ourselves.

In the late ’80s, the term “helper’s high” was used to describe the euphoria feeling associated with volunteering. Beyond happiness, generous people also experienced enhanced creativity, flexibility, resilience and being open to new information. They’re more collaborative at work; they’re able to solve complex problems more easily and they form solid, healthy relationships with others.

Generosity allows us to forget our own self-importance.

As Stephen G. Post, Ph.D., happiness researcher and founder of The Institute for Research on Unlimited Love, writes, “It may be people who live generous lives soon become aware that in the giving of self lies the unsought discovery of self as the old selfish pursuit of happiness is subjectively revealed as futile and short-sighted.” Generosity allows us to forget our own self-importance, even temporarily, and look outward to uplift those around us who, in turn, often uplift those around them.

Shawn Achor, a Harvard-trained researcher and The Happiness Guy at SUCCESS, calls this the ripple effect. Our behavior, he discovered, is literally contagious. “Our habits, attitudes and actions spread through a complicated web of connections to infect those around us,” he writes. That’s why we sync up with our best friends, often finishing each other’s sentences and reading each other’s thoughts. It’s also why one negative attitude can spread like a disease across an office and infect everyone’s mood.

So are happier people more generous, or does generosity make us happier? Rather than thinking of it as a cause-and-effect relationship, consider happiness and generosity as intertwining entities. “Generating and expressing kindness quickly dispels suffering and replaces it with lasting fulfillment,” writes Ricard, the Buddhist monk. “In turn the gradual actualization of genuine happiness allows kindness to develop as the natural reflection of inner joy.” Helping behavior increases positive emotions, which increases our sense of purpose, regulates stress, and improves short- and long-term health. All of that contributes to a heightened level of happiness, causing us to feel more generous, creating a circle of happiness and generosity.

Why We Aren’t Generous All the Time

I failed twice during my month-long challenge. What began as a positive and energizing morning was quickly derailed—a negative social media post, a complaining text, an overwhelmed co-worker. I refocused my thoughts and tried to make this my kind act for the day. What if I can turn this person’s day around? What if I can help him see the positive side of his situation? I listened, nodded with concern, hyper-aware of my facial expressions, eager to exude empathy and understanding. I’m not sure what I exuded, but both of us left feeling worse than before.

What happened? According to Paul Bloom, professor of psychology and cognitive science at Yale University and author of Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion, I had confused empathy with compassion, resulting in empathetic distress and burnout. Empathy requires feeling what others feel, “to experience, as much as you can, the terrible sorrow and pain,” whereas compassion involves concern and a desire to help without the need to mirror someone else’s anguish.

It turns out, you can be too nice. Psychologists Vicki Helgeson and Heidi Fritz created a questionnaire revealing that women are more likely to put others’ needs before their own, often resulting in asymmetrical relationships as well as an increased risk of depression and anxiety. When we experience empathetic burnout, we often shy away from generosity altogether. Feeling taken advantage of, we retreat inward.

Researchers have also theorized that every kind act is ultimately done to benefit ourselves in some way, even subconsciously. This concept, coined “universal egoism,” offers explanations that are easier to accept than true altruism: a desire to help others void of selfish motives. For example, there are multiple situations that can be initially perceived as true altruism but at its core, the kind act is governed by selfish motives. Ben Dean, Ph.D., psychologist and founder of MentorCoach in Maryland, offers three such examples:

  • It’s a natural response to feel uncomfortable when we see someone suffering. But rather than help in order to ease their suffering, we help them to ease our own discomfort.
  • In an attempt to protect our fragile egos and reputations, we don’t want to be viewed as insensitive, heartless, mean, etc. So we help others even when we might not feel an urge to improve their well-being.
  • We perceive there to be some form of personal benefit from the act, either short- or long-term.

The question remains: Is there a truly selfless act of kindness?

The question remains: Is there a truly selfless act of kindness? And does it even matter where our motivations lie? The homeless man in New York still ate a hot meal, and the two little boys at the pharmacy didn’t stay up all night coughing. Isn’t that what matters?

How 30 Days of Kindness Made Me a Better Person

We aren’t consistently generous for a multitude of reasons, but in the traditional corporate setting, the prevailing enemy of generosity is the fear of appearing naïve. (And the possibility of going broke.) After all, isn’t the nice guy the one who finishes last? So we become “Givers” as Adam Grant Ph.D., details in his best-seller Give and Take. In the modern workplace, we are no longer solely evaluated on our work performance, but rather on how we interact as a cohesive unit and how we contribute to the organization as a whole. In fact, Grant’s research reveals this new business landscape paves the way for Givers to succeed and Takers to be left behind. By helping others, we help ourselves.

The important thing to remember is that Givers—especially those predisposed to putting others’ needs before their own—need to know their boundaries. Grant says it begins with distinguishing generosity from its three other attributes: timidity, availability and empathy.

At the risk of sounding cliché, my month of generosity did make me happier. Something about waking up and consciously planning to act selflessly lightened my step and made the morning drag easier to bear. Something about a stranger flashing a smile (albeit a confused one) as I handed them a dog-eared copy of my favorite memoir gave me an energy boost that a triple-shot latte never could.

For a precious hour or so every day, the fear, anxiety, stress and doubt of daily life didn’t plague my thoughts. I briefly forgot about myself, and it was intoxicating. Friends responded to my seemingly arbitrary good mood with confused laughs. When did being happy without reason become a cause for concern? I wondered.

Maybe my heart was in the right place when I gave the blue-eyed man a hot meal. But maybe my ego was directing my actions that night in the pharmacy checkout lane. And maybe I avoided generosity toward my close friends and co-workers because it was more difficult. Buying coffee for a stranger is easy, detached and allows for a clean exit. Gently pushing a friend to divulge her source of anxiety after she says “I’m fine” is not. After all, altruism and honest self-reflection take time and practice.

Thirty days of generosity didn’t make me a different person, but I do feel different. I don’t actively look for ways to be generous, but I notice the opportunities anyway. Like the sticky note residue on my bathroom mirror, I can see gentle impressions of my growth where I least expect it: during rush hour, when I give the benefit of the doubt to the woman cutting into my lane; after a long day of work, when I make time for the struggling friend who needs to talk; and, most important, in the moments when I forget myself and realize the joy to be found in caring for the people around me.

 

Source:

How 30 Days of Kindness Made Me a Better Person

 

 

 

Top 7 Tips for How to Be Happy

Here are our top tips for how to find true and lasting happiness in daily life:

1. Let go of negativity.

  • Learn to forgive and forget.

  • See every challenge as an opportunity for further growth.

  • Express gratitude for what you have.

  • Be more optimistic about the future and your ability to accomplish life goals.

  • Open yourself up to success and embrace failures or mistakes that happen along the way.

  • Know that none of us are perfect, we are all here to entertain and be entertained.

  • Don’t worry about the little things. Take plenty of “worry vacations” where you train your mind not to worry for a certain lengths of time.

  • If you want to be more positive, surround yourself with positive energy and people. Nurture the positive relationships that you have, seeking out more of those relationships that help uplift you.

  • Accept and love yourself for the unique gifts and talents that you bring to life. Spend less time trying to please others and spend more time trying to please your higher self.

  • See the humor in life and in our experiences. Take life less seriously and learn to laugh at yourself.

2. Serve and be kind to others.

  • Treat everyone with kindness. Not only does it help others to feel better, but you will notice that you too feel good after having a positive interaction with others.

  • Speak well of others. When you speak negatively of others you will attract more negativity to yourself, but when you speak positively of others, you will attract more positivity.

  • Truly listen to others. Be present and mindful to what others are really saying when they speak. Support them without bringing yourself into it.

  • Be careful with your words. Speak gentler, kinder, and wiser.

  • Respect others and their free will.

  • Put your trust in others and be trusted in return. Enjoy the sense of community and friendship that comes from this openness and faith in one another.

  • Work as part of a whole. See others as partners in your efforts. Unite your efforts with them to create a synergy more powerful than anything you could do alone.

  • Practice generosity and giving without expecting anything in return. Get involved with service opportunities and offer what you can to a greater cause.

  • Smile more– to family, to co-workers, to neighbors, to strangers– and watch it not only change how you feel but also how they feel too.

3. Live in the present.

  • Don’t replay negative events or worry about the future.

  • Accept and celebrate impermanence. Be grateful for your life, for each moment of every day. Observe the constant and natural flow of change that surrounds us, and your small yet important part of the natural, divine flow of life.

  • Observe yourself in the moment. Work on your reactions to outer circumstances and learn how to approach life harmoniously.

4. Choose a healthy lifestyle.

  • Keep a daily routine. Wake up at the same time every morning, preferably early. Setting yourself to a natural biorhythm will make it easier to wake up and feel energized.

  • Get enough sleep. Proper sleep is linked to positive personality characteristics like optimism, improved self-esteem, and even problem-solving.

  • Expose yourself to cold temperatures (especially first thing in the morning with perhaps a cold shower). It increases your circulation, helps minimize inflammation in the body, enhances weight loss, and energizes and invigorates you to start your day.

  • Turn off the TV. For every hour of TV you watch, you reduce 22 minutes of your life expectancy.

  • Eat properly. What you eat has a direct effect on your mood and energy levels. Eat plenty of organic, locally grown fruits and vegetables, nuts, whole grains, and dairy products that are both vitamin and mineral-infused. Don’t overeat and try to practice healthy self-control.

  • Exercise daily to the point of sweating. It not only helps to purify the body, but also releases endorphins which help to prevent stress, relieve depression, and positively improve your mood.

  • Laugh more. Laughter is the best medicine. Like exercise, it releases endorphins that battle the negative effects of stress and promote a sense of well-being and joy.

  • Practice deep breathing and yoga. The body and mind are connected. Emotions affect the physical systems in the body, and the state of the body also affects the mind. By relaxing and releasing tension through the breath or yoga practice you feel calmer and centered throughout the day.

5. Take care of your spirit.

  • Strive to always learn new things. Constantly expand your awareness and discover new ways of expressing your divine gifts.

  • Get creative. This will not only challenge you to learn new things but will also help to keep your mind in a positive place. Practice living in the present moment and being a channel for the divine flow of creativity.

  • Practice meditation. Research has proven that even as little as 10 minutes of meditation a day can lead to physical changes in the brain that improve concentration and focus, calm the nervous system, and help you to become more kind and compassionate, and even more humorous. Then bring the joy and peace you receive from meditation into your daily life and activity.

  • Be honest. Telling the truth keeps you free inside, builds trust in relationships, and improves your will power and the ability to attract success.

  • Surrender to the Universe Divine and allow it to take care of the littlest things in life to the greatest and most important.

6. Be inwardly free.

  • Live minimally and simply. Often extravagant living brings more stress, not more satisfaction.

  • De-clutter your home to de-clutter your mind. Clutter is an often unrecognized source of stress that promotes feelings of anxiety, frustration, distraction, and guilt. Feel good in your own home. Make it your sanctuary by keeping it clean, organized, and uplifting.

  • Go without certain things you think you need. Travel to new places where not everything is as easily accessible or readily available, and learn to appreciate what you have by expanding your world.

  • Take some time away from life’s complicated outer involvements to get to know your family, your neighbors, and your loved ones better; and to get to know yourself.

7.  Reconnect with Nature.

  • Take some time every week to recharge your body battery. On the weekend, escape to nature or a place where you can feel peace in time for a fresh start to the workweek.

  • Get outside whenever possible to breathe in the fresh air and feel the sunshine. Both of which studies have shown to have a positive effect on our health and our mood.

  • Take some time to be silent. Be silent and calm every night for at least 10 minutes (longer if possible) and again in the morning before rising. This will produce an unbreakable habit of inner happiness to help you meet challenges in life.

  • Observe the natural beauty that surrounds you and feel a sense of connection. Appreciate the details and miracles that can be found in nature.

Taking the Next Steps to Finding Happiness:

Ask yourself what makes you happy, and find ways to restructure your life so that you are able to do more of those things.

Then ask why you struggle to do the things that you know will make you happy. Why are you not yet happy? Why haven’t you taken the next steps to find your happiness? Why are you here? And what do you need to do to feel a sense of accomplishment in this life?

Visualize yourself happy, doing the things that will bring you inner and outer success in life and write down the things you need to do to create a Happiness Bucket List. Start with the little things you know you can do each day that will bring you joy. Then move on to accomplish greater and greater things on your happiness bucket list.

Source:

Top 7 Tips for How to Be Happy

Shout out to Dad! Good times…

 

Happy Father’s Day to all the amazing Dads out there.

Here’s my dad in the 80’s (Mario Brothers Mustache and all- A trend I hope never comes back though LOL) taking me to Indian Princesses camp (dads and daughters).  Yeah I thought my 90’s rolled up jeans looked so rad!

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This was a time where you had fun as a kid just hanging from a stick because your dad can actually hold it up high enough.  This is how much fun dads can be and this is really what kids should experience with their dads.

dad indian princess

He’s always been there for me and I love him to death!

dad

Now that I’m all grown up (supposedly) He’s now my business logo designer.  My dad’s a crazy good artist so he actually hand drew this from scratch and designed my logo for Hairmingo:)

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05_19_18Hairmingo

My Mascot, Gretchen Mingo, was an original design by a local young artist in Bloomingdale, IL that is so creative and just kills it every time!

topratedgretchen-01

He’s a rockstar at painting shoes too.   Yes, I am a big fan & client,  My converse Hairmingo shoes are so so cool. See below.  If you ever need an artist for logos, shoes, apparel, anything and want to support a super talented hard working young man, here’s where you find him:

Instagram: ImKrisBrown

Check it out!

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My parting quote for today:

fathersday

 

1 handshake changed my son’s life

I think we’ve all seen firsthand how incredibly unique we all are as people: personalities, interests & even our social skills.  I’m a pretty outgoing person, but my youngest son is very shy and gets uncomfortable around groups of people.  I saw him struggling with how to talk to people and interact with strangers.

I started a project with him to help him overcome his struggles.  I asked him to start by saying one kind comment to a stranger every time we went out that looked like they could use a smile.

His first day on the job, we were at the grocery store.  The man bagging our groceries was handicap.  My 7 year old looked at him and said, “Hi.  I just wanted to tell you that you’re doing a great job.  Thank you.”  He shook the gentlemen’s hand while saying thank you.  The man smiled at him and said, “I really appreciate you saying that.  I’ve had a really bad day, and I feel happier now.  Thank you”.

My son was beaming from ear to ear to see that his kind words made someone smile who really deserved a smile that day.

Since that day, he gets so excited to search for the person he thinks needs a smile to give them a word of kindness.  Not only does he feel more comfortable around strangers, but he feels like a million bucks when he sees someone positively affected by his words.

No matter your age, a small act of kindness can change your life and others.

Doughnuts provide care for a sick woman

People are buying all the doughnuts in this bakery so the owner can spend time with his sick wife

A small, family-owned business is more popular than ever for an incredibly sweet reason.
Donut City

NBC Los Angeles

 / Source: TODAY
By Erica Chayes Wida

For the last few weeks, a small, family-owned bakery on a highway in Seal Beach, California, has been selling out its entire supply of doughnuts every morning for an incredibly sweet reason.

Donut City, a no-frills spot known for its freshly baked treats, was started nearly 30 years ago by husband and wife John and Stella Chhan. They run the cafe seven days a week and, though it’s perched beside a 7-Eleven, has a very loyal following of customers who pop in for sweets at modest prices.

But on Sept. 22, Stella suffered a “debilitating [brain] aneurysm,” the Orange County Register reported, and customers began to notice her absence. Some asked John, 62, if his wife was OK, including a regular named Dawn Caviola who — after learning of Stella’s condition — could think of little else.

“I went home and I just couldn’t get it out of my head,” Caviola told NBC News earlier this month. “They are just such hardworking people.”

After posting an idea to buy out all of the shop’s doughnuts to Nextdoor, a social networking site that serves as a platform for local community members, the support (and hunger for doughnuts) rolled in. Donut City usually opens around 4:30 a.m. and usually stayed open until the early afternoon. But with the locals’ efforts, John was able to close earlier and earlier — meaning that’s he able to go home and spend time with his wife.

On Nov. 3, John told NBC News that Stella was doing much better, could speak again and was re-learning how to eat. That morning, after his inventory was totally sold out, he was able to close the shop at 8:30 a.m.

Still, the crowds continue to flock to Donut City and John is able to close earlier and earlier.

“I came to Donut City to pick up two dozen donuts for my department. It is 6:30am. They are sold out of donuts. This is crazy,” someone posted to Facebook on Tuesday.

Many on social media are also praising those who have rallied behind the Chhans.

And through several compassionate Facebook share’s, it’s clear why this doughnut shop has such loyal customers.

“BEST DONUTS EVER served by the Sweetest people ever,” one local wrote.

“The best donuts in the world, the owner is amazing and we are truly blessed to eat and enjoy their donuts,” another said.

“I used to get dropped off here before elementary school and grab some donuts and walk to school,” a grown man commented. “This guy is a complete gem. Always a smile and allllways dropping free donut holes in the bag.”

Stella and John moved to the U.S. from Cambodia in 1979. They purchased Donut City in 1990 and have been running the business together ever since.

“I feel very warm and very happy,” he said. “Thank you to everyone.”

Simple act of kindness

LEAD WITH A DEED

Our Facebook group, Lead with a deed, is dedicated to sharing stories of acts of kindness.

A few years ago I had started a new job and noticed a woman in my office that always looked so sad.  My co-workers had shown her very little regard as a person and she was silently pushed aside from the daily office conversations.

I saw her in the lunchroom one day sitting alone while the rest of the lunch timers all sat together talking.  I sat next to her from then on every day.

She told me 2 years later that the first day I sat with her she was feeling so sad and contemplated committing suicide.  Befriending her that day changed her mindset from suicide to hope and happiness.

A simple act of kindness does make a difference in someone’s life.  I would love to hear your stories on experiences with showing kindness.  Share with us on Lead with a deed or even here in the blog.

The more people see how much kindness does influence a life the more we can support others to go out of their way to be kind.

As the owner of Hairmingo, I personally thank all who have shown others kindness and love!

Hairmingo Tami

Hairmingo on Facebook

Lead with a deed on Facebook

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