How to Prevent Job Burnout in 3 Simple Steps

With our demanding, on-the-go lifestyles, burnout might feel inevitable. With these tips, it’s possible to avoid.

With globalization, digitalization, dual-income households, and social media, people are experiencing job burnout now more than ever.

We’re all out to achieve so much more than our ancestors did because, well, life isn’t just about survival anymore (thank goodness!). This wave of busyness and accelerated living is exciting, but it’s also causing a drained generation.

On the work front, mental health is a hot topic for organizations everywhere because it’s costing companies money. For instance, the prevalence of major depression within the workforce is estimated to cost $210 billion per year and, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), it’s the leading cause of disability worldwide. Recently, the WHO classified burnout as a legitimate medical diagnosis, characterizing it as “a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.” The ability of a doctor to diagnose a patient with burnout legitimizes the condition and underscores the seriousness of being afflicted.

Signs of job burnout can be classified as becoming overridden by any mental health issues from depression, anxiety, and stress to deeper, more complex issues. However, you don’t need to be overtaken by physical work to feel burnt out. In fact, emotional labor can cause feelings of fatigue that mimic depression.

Considering that one in five people will be affected by some form of mental health issue in their lifetime, it’s important to understand the signs of burnout and to invest in your mental wellbeing today to ensure a healthy and functional future.

1. Check yourself

Overcommitting and charging full speed ahead without minding the why behind a certain decision is probably the number one mistake people make today. Instead of following your heart’s desire, it’s quite possible that you’re one of many people who are living the life that society has dictated without stopping to consider what you want. People say “yes” all day to functions, people, tasks, and things without stopping and asking themselves what they want.

  • DON’T: Do things only because you “should” do them. Should is a dirty word.
  • DO: Practice regular check-in’s with yourself to avoid life and job burnout. Review the many areas of life. Do you feel the way you want to feel?

2. Practice self-love

It’s absolutely critical to take the time to care for yourself. There is no excuse. Self-love will be whatever you need to recharge. For me, it’s nature, quiet, and creativity. For others, it might be a night out with close friends or a long run. Do something regularly that helps you unwind and feel grounded again.

  • DON’T: Put yourself last. You cannot be a great partner/parent/teammate/relative/employee if you’re always feeling burnt out from your job.
  • DO: Practice self-love and take an inventory of your feelings: How did a certain activity make you feel?

3. Pay attention

The sooner you’re able to detect the signs of a burnout creeping up on you, the better. This perception takes emotional intelligence and the ability to be conscious of your emotions. Your body will tell you something’s wrong — you just need to listen to it. Some physical signs of job burnout include exhaustion, insomnia, irritability, loss of interest, and lack of appetite. You can stay in tune with yourself by having regular check-ins with yourself. A journal makes the process of checking in natural and can be helpful for future references. Journaling also helps with unwinding, putting things into perspective, and releasing negative feelings.

  • DON’T: Delay! Two in three people will keep their concerns about mental health to themselves for fear of being judged. Release yourself from this stigma and seek help. Chances are others have felt the same way.
  • DO: Pay attention to your heart every day. Be mindful of how you’re feeling. If you notice anything that worries you, ask a friend about it.

I mentioned before that mental health affects one in five people. You may not be exempt and that’s OK. The most important thing is to build resilience now. A healthy, strong foundation can withstand the storm. By taking care of yourself now you can be better prepared when crisis strikes — because it just might! Life has a tendency to compound on us. Sometimes when it rains, it pours, so invest in a good roof today.

If you are facing a mental-health challenge or you are experiencing signs of burnout, reach out and seek help.

Source:

https://www.topresume.com/career-advice/3-tips-to-avoid-burning-out

Workplace Wellness: 5 Ways to Mind Mental Health at Work

Take care of your mental health in the workplace.

“Productivity” is the boardroom buzzword on the lips of business owners and managers across the globe. All too often however, this results in employees being pushed to demonstrate productivity at the expense of their job satisfaction and even, in some cases, their general mental health.

Encouraging and supportive employers are crucial to a truly productive team, but any mutually beneficial relationship requires both give and take. With that in mind, here is a series of simple and effective productivity tips you can use to achieve wellness in the workplace and find a balance between mental well-being and professional performance.

Take a break

Downtime is non-negotiable when it comes to productivity. Various studies even highlight the importance of taking regular breaks, like “movement breaks,” which are designed to reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and depression. Spending long stretches of time at your desk can negatively affect your reasoning ability, your motivation, and your creativity, so don’t feel the need to remain glued there throughout the working day. In the long run, your mind and body will thank you for it.

Whether you go for a short walk to breathe some fresh air, kick back with a book in the break room, or simply indulge in some “waking rest,” every little bit helps. The key is to recognize that working longer does not necessarily mean working better, and you’ll actually be doing yourself a big favor by taking a little break every hour or two to recharge your mental batteries.

Communicate honestly

Open and honest communication is a vital piece of the puzzle when it comes to protecting your mental well-being in the workplace. Naturally, this goes two ways, as employers who are upfront and understanding take the stress out of office dialogues. But you can also decide to be the catalyst for direct communication and stand by this approach when it matters most.

In the face of mountainous workloads, unrealistic deadlines, or other genuine grievances surrounding your role, the best thing you can do is find a respectful and sincere way to voice your concerns and carve a path towards a more manageable and productive working day.

Clock in and out on time

Just like it’s important to take regular breaks, it’s also crucial to take your start and finish times seriously. Overworked staff are notoriously unproductive, with so-called “work martyrs” sacrificing hours of personal time in the name of reducing their workloads. Productive output drops dramatically after the 50-hour/week mark and plummets completely beyond 55 hours. Making this personal sacrifice is a serious physical and mental drain on those who make it, and, ultimately, a waste of valuable time.

Instead, clock in on time and leave on time — make the most of your contracted hours and know when to call it a day. Drawing clear dividing lines between your personal and professional lives is an essential basis for an effective work-life balance. By respecting these important boundaries, you can reap the benefits in and out of work.

Never, ever multi-task

Word is spreading throughout the working world about the dangers of multitasking, and it’s time to bust this widespread myth once and for all. Truth is, we only think we’re multitasking. It’s far more likely that we’re actually just shifting focus repeatedly between one task and another, ultimately without making much progress on either of the two outstanding jobs.

Treat yourself

Last but certainly not least, no matter what line of work you’re in, everyone deserves the gratification that comes with the occasional reward, and sometimes, it pays to be your own benefactor. Treats come in all shapes and sizes — some tangible, others abstract — but the important thing to remember is that everyone is different, and it’s about finding what gives you the emotional spring in your step that helps you get the job done.

Whether it’s indulging in a luxurious out-of-office lunch, embarking on an after-work shopping spree, or stocking up on gourmet coffee products to see you through the working day, don’t stop treating yourself. A personal reward for working at your best is the least you deserve, and these little pick-me-ups could be the secret to seeing the productivity boost you’re looking for.

Source:

https://www.topresume.com/career-advice/tips-to-balancing-work-and-life

5 ways to de-stress and help your heart

 

Managing unhealthy habits key to change

Constant stress — whether from a traffic-choked daily commute, unhappy marriage, or heavy workload — can have real physical effects on the body. It has been linked to a wide range of health issues, including mood, sleep, and appetite problems — and yes, even heart disease.

Doctors don’t know exactly how chronic stress affects the heart. Most likely, stress triggers inflammation, a known instigator of heart disease, but that hasn’t been proven. “I think the conventional opinion is that stress is bad for your heart, but the data are much murkier,” says Dr. Deepak Bhatt, director of the Integrated Interventional Cardiovascular Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Yet stress may influence heart disease in more subtle ways. “Stress does cause some people to act in ways that increase their risk for heart disease,” Dr. Bhatt says. For example, when stressed, people often eat unhealthy food and don’t have the energy or time to exercise. Stress can also lead us into other heart-damaging behaviors, such as smoking and drinking too much alcohol.

Breaking the connection requires both learning to deal with stress and managing unhealthy habits. These five simple tips can help you do just that.

  1. Stay positive. Laughter has been found to lower levels of stress hormones, reduce inflammation in the arteries, and increase “good” HDL cholesterol.
  2. Meditate. This practice of inward-focused thought and deep breathing has been shown to reduce heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure. Meditation’s close relatives, yoga and prayer, can also relax the mind and body.
  3. Exercise. Every time you are physically active, whether you take a walk or play tennis, your body releases mood-boosting chemicals called endorphins. Exercising not only melts away stress, it also protects against heart disease by lowering your blood pressure, strengthening your heart muscle, and helping you maintain a healthy weight.
  4. Unplug. It’s impossible to escape stress when it follows you everywhere. Cut the cord. Avoid emails and TV news. Take time each day — even if it’s for just 10 or 15 minutes — to escape from the world.
  5. Find ways to take the edge off your stress. Simple things, like a warm bath, listening to music, or spending time on a favorite hobby, can give you a much-needed break from the stressors in your life.

Stress doesn’t have to ruin your life or your health. To learn more about how stress affects your heart, health, and well-being, and what to do about it, buy Stress Management, a Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School.

Image: Bigstock

Source:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/5-ways-to-de-stress-and-help-your-heart

Service dog helps 7-year-old boy prepare for his 10th surgery

When Indiana resident Gavin Swearingen was just 2 years old, he let go of a swing, hit his head and suffered a traumatic brain injury. The little boy lost about 75% of the left side of his brain, developed epilepsy and cerebral palsy, and has survived several strokes.

So last year, Gavin, who lives in Carmel, just north of Indianapolis, got his first service dog. Elmer, a Labrador-golden retriever mixed breed trained by the nonprofit Canine Companions for Independence, helps with the boy’s physical challenges in myriad ways.

“It’s magic,” his mom, Amanda Swearingen, 36, told TODAY. “I jokingly say they’re both puppies — they love to play. Gavin is 7 and Elmer is 2. They run and chase each other and they’re silly.”

Gavin Swearingen and his service dog, Elmer
“Throwing the ball to me 10 times is therapy,” Amanda Swearingen said. “Throwing the ball for Elmer 20 times is fun.”Liz Kaye

Due to hemiplegic cerebral palsy, Gavin’s right side is not as strong as his left, so he holds Elmer’s leash in his right hand, which pulls his arm down and changes his gait to appear neurotypical.

Gavin lost peripheral vision on his right side after his accident, so Elmer walks on the boy’s right to act as a buffer in crowds. The friendly dog makes physical therapy seem like a game instead of a chore.

“Throwing the ball to me 10 times is therapy,” Swearingen said. “Throwing the ball for Elmer 20 times is fun.”

Before teaming up with Elmer, Gavin struggled with reading. But he now reads books to Elmer every single day. They particularly love the “Elephant and Piggy” books by Mo Willems.

“We were all kind of at our end of what to do next, and all it took was Elmer. Now Gavin’s reading almost to grade level. He’s reading for fun and enjoyment,” Swearingen said.

Gavin Swearingen and his service dog, Elmer
Before teaming up with Elmer, Gavin struggled with reading. But the 7-year-old now reads books to Elmer every single day. Liz Kaye Photography

It’s a remarkable turnaround since the accident, when doctors told the Swearingens that Gavin would never walk, talk or even know them. But thanks to neuroplasticity, Gavin’s brain has “remapped” onto the right side and he continues to improve with Elmer’s help.

The family – which includes Gavin’s father, Brad, and sisters Alyson, 12, and Makenna, 9 – faces everything in life together. Each night at the dinner table, they take turns sharing what they’re grateful for.

“I can’t say this is a path that I ever expected to be on, but we are definitely going to make the most of it and try and remain grateful for it because gratitude is the opposite of sadness,” Swearingen said. “We choose gratitude.”

Despite all of Gavin’s challenges, the word most people use to describe him is “joyful,” according to his mom.

“I think that’s actually why having a dog has worked really well because it’s the same personality,” she said. “They find the best, and every day it’s like they wake up and it’s a brand-new day and they’re both just excited to go play outside.”

Amanda Swearingen and her son, Gavin, and his service dog, Elmer
Amanda Swearingen’s son, Gavin, has shown tremendous improvement ever since his service dog, Elmer, joined the family. Doctors had previously told the Swearingens that Gavin would never walk, talk or even know them. Liz Kaye

But now Gavin is scared. He’s facing his 10th cranial surgery to repair a hole in his skull, which puts him at risk for another brain injury.

Amanda Swearingen’s son Gavin and his service dog “Elmer” at Holiday Park on Sunday June 2, 2019.Liz Kaye Photography

Free and simple ways to improve your well being

Life becomes hectic and gets in the way sometimes.  We are too busy and have too much on our plate. Life unexpectedly throws a curve ball here and there.  However, did you know that a simple act of kindness can bring you peace and joy into your life?

Research shows that random acts of kindness not only boosts your physical health but also helps you to maintain positive outlook on life.

What’s more, it doesn’t have to be grand or expensive. By nature, we are hard-wired for love and compassion. We genuinely feel good when we give, help or contribute without expectation of reciprocation of acknowledgement. It can create a powerful ripple effect that people continue to pay forward what they have received. Thus, kindness is a win-win which brightens our community as a whole.

So, why not start today? Make kindness a daily habit. Make a difference in your life and someone else’s. Besides, kindness is contagious. What goes around comes around. It is particularly true with kindness. Show your kindness in any given moment, at any place and with anyone. They will remember your generosity and they will turn around and spread kindness to others as well. It will also be an excellent opportunity to teach your children to do the same and grow up to be kind adults.

While there are plenty of simple things we can do without breaking a sweat, and yet are easy to forget to practice, start with these 15 simple acts of kindness you can do today, tomorrow and everyday. They will certainly make your day and someone else’s.

1. Put on a smile

One of most attractive trait in a person is a nice friendly smile. Saying hello with a smile makes you approachable and a good impression.  Smiles can open the door for you to make more friendly friends and expand your social circles.

2. Show your love

We value relationships more than material things in life. According to Maya Angelou, people will never forget how we made them feel. So make them feel loved, especially the ones who are dear to you.  Check out The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman if you want to learn more on how to express love.

3. Forgive

Forgiveness is not an easy task. It takes courage and sometimes a lot of time and practice. However, forgiving with empathy is part of being kind to someone, especially the one who wronged you and hurt you in some way. Also, be kind to yourself and forgive your mistakes. Self-love is to treat you with such kindness that you don’t allow anger, resentment or negativities in your life.

4. Open the door or hold an elevator

We live in a world where everything needs to be rushed through. Holding doors for others seems to be simply cultural practices in our society.  However, we do it not because it’s customarily expected but because it’s our intention to help others to minimize the collective effort that needs to be spent on daily tasks, which ultimately makes everyone’s life a bit easier.

5. Bring a cup of joe for a colleague

A simple gesture like bringing a cup of coffee for someone in the morning will make their day.  A little consideration like this will foster their productivity at work while promoting the relationship which in turn will make your workplace friendly and kinder place.

6. Give up your seat at the waiting room, on the train or bus

The next time you are traveling by bus or in a public place, offer your seat to an elderly person. This is a great way to show your respect for the elderly. Perhaps there is a pregnant woman or a child struggling to stay standing on a moving vehicle. Offer your seat to someone who needs it every time you have the opportunity.

7. Give a hand to someone who needs help with something heavy

When you see a woman struggling to walk up stairs with kids and heavy bags, help her. Even the smallest act of service is rewarding and joyful. You wouldn’t want your wife or sister struggling without anyone’s help, would you?

8. Let someone merge during traffic

We all get frustrated in traffic at one time or another. One additional car in front of you isn’t going to make you arrive any earlier or later than you already would have been. So the next time someone is waiting to merge, be the kind person and let him in.

9. Offer a babysitting to a friend

Parenting is the most rewarding job and at the same time overwhelming. Offer to babysit for a friend or neighbor, especially a single parent who doesn’t get much help. This simple support will give a parent a break to recharge and relax a bit which will also benefit the child.

10. Bake cookies for your new neighbour

Well, it doesn’t have to be baked-cookies. You can offer a cold glass of water to a neighbor who’s trimming a tree in a hot summer day. Paying a visit with a bright smile or inviting them over for a tea would make them feel safe and welcomed.

11. Bring a cup of chicken soup to a sick person

We remember how we’ve felt when someone took care of us when we were sick. Show them you care and offer help when needed. This will lift his spirit up.  In addition, it will make both his stomach and his heart warm and fuzzy.

12. Don’t interrupt when someone is talking

Pay attention to what the other person is saying. Active listening is not only an act of kindness but also a skill that we can benefit from improving. You will have more chance to avoid conflicts and misunderstandings.

13. Fix Something for someone else

If someone needs to have something fixed or put together, and you are handy with these sorts of things, it’s the perfect opportunity to offer your skills. Surprisingly, you may enjoy some fun doing it together. The bonus is the more you put your skill into practice the better you will get at it.

14. Give compliments

As words have the power to both heal and destroy, a nice compliment can reinforce their value in the world. With genuine compliments, you let them know they are noticed. So, speak kindly and give them a little gift of appreciation.

15. Say yes to a donation request

Making a donation doesn’t have to be thousands of dollars or hard work at Habitat for humanity. It can be a $1 donation to a local shelter or a can of soup for your local food bank. It won’t break your wallet. Imagine there’s someone out there smiling when they receive what you gave.

So, what’s in your kindness jar today?

 

Source:

https://www.lifehack.org/356919/simple-acts-kindness-can-improve-our-well-being-research-says?fbclid=IwAR1okhb8ImD_VhKs-9ldOp7T92kNH4xIrkqMhZbZOT_jDcHFNZlO4HxeZRQ

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