How to Prevent Job Burnout in 3 Simple Steps

With our demanding, on-the-go lifestyles, burnout might feel inevitable. With these tips, it’s possible to avoid.

With globalization, digitalization, dual-income households, and social media, people are experiencing job burnout now more than ever.

We’re all out to achieve so much more than our ancestors did because, well, life isn’t just about survival anymore (thank goodness!). This wave of busyness and accelerated living is exciting, but it’s also causing a drained generation.

On the work front, mental health is a hot topic for organizations everywhere because it’s costing companies money. For instance, the prevalence of major depression within the workforce is estimated to cost $210 billion per year and, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), it’s the leading cause of disability worldwide. Recently, the WHO classified burnout as a legitimate medical diagnosis, characterizing it as “a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.” The ability of a doctor to diagnose a patient with burnout legitimizes the condition and underscores the seriousness of being afflicted.

Signs of job burnout can be classified as becoming overridden by any mental health issues from depression, anxiety, and stress to deeper, more complex issues. However, you don’t need to be overtaken by physical work to feel burnt out. In fact, emotional labor can cause feelings of fatigue that mimic depression.

Considering that one in five people will be affected by some form of mental health issue in their lifetime, it’s important to understand the signs of burnout and to invest in your mental wellbeing today to ensure a healthy and functional future.

1. Check yourself

Overcommitting and charging full speed ahead without minding the why behind a certain decision is probably the number one mistake people make today. Instead of following your heart’s desire, it’s quite possible that you’re one of many people who are living the life that society has dictated without stopping to consider what you want. People say “yes” all day to functions, people, tasks, and things without stopping and asking themselves what they want.

  • DON’T: Do things only because you “should” do them. Should is a dirty word.
  • DO: Practice regular check-in’s with yourself to avoid life and job burnout. Review the many areas of life. Do you feel the way you want to feel?

2. Practice self-love

It’s absolutely critical to take the time to care for yourself. There is no excuse. Self-love will be whatever you need to recharge. For me, it’s nature, quiet, and creativity. For others, it might be a night out with close friends or a long run. Do something regularly that helps you unwind and feel grounded again.

  • DON’T: Put yourself last. You cannot be a great partner/parent/teammate/relative/employee if you’re always feeling burnt out from your job.
  • DO: Practice self-love and take an inventory of your feelings: How did a certain activity make you feel?

3. Pay attention

The sooner you’re able to detect the signs of a burnout creeping up on you, the better. This perception takes emotional intelligence and the ability to be conscious of your emotions. Your body will tell you something’s wrong — you just need to listen to it. Some physical signs of job burnout include exhaustion, insomnia, irritability, loss of interest, and lack of appetite. You can stay in tune with yourself by having regular check-ins with yourself. A journal makes the process of checking in natural and can be helpful for future references. Journaling also helps with unwinding, putting things into perspective, and releasing negative feelings.

  • DON’T: Delay! Two in three people will keep their concerns about mental health to themselves for fear of being judged. Release yourself from this stigma and seek help. Chances are others have felt the same way.
  • DO: Pay attention to your heart every day. Be mindful of how you’re feeling. If you notice anything that worries you, ask a friend about it.

I mentioned before that mental health affects one in five people. You may not be exempt and that’s OK. The most important thing is to build resilience now. A healthy, strong foundation can withstand the storm. By taking care of yourself now you can be better prepared when crisis strikes — because it just might! Life has a tendency to compound on us. Sometimes when it rains, it pours, so invest in a good roof today.

If you are facing a mental-health challenge or you are experiencing signs of burnout, reach out and seek help.

Source:

https://www.topresume.com/career-advice/3-tips-to-avoid-burning-out

Workplace Wellness: 5 Ways to Mind Mental Health at Work

Take care of your mental health in the workplace.

“Productivity” is the boardroom buzzword on the lips of business owners and managers across the globe. All too often however, this results in employees being pushed to demonstrate productivity at the expense of their job satisfaction and even, in some cases, their general mental health.

Encouraging and supportive employers are crucial to a truly productive team, but any mutually beneficial relationship requires both give and take. With that in mind, here is a series of simple and effective productivity tips you can use to achieve wellness in the workplace and find a balance between mental well-being and professional performance.

Take a break

Downtime is non-negotiable when it comes to productivity. Various studies even highlight the importance of taking regular breaks, like “movement breaks,” which are designed to reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and depression. Spending long stretches of time at your desk can negatively affect your reasoning ability, your motivation, and your creativity, so don’t feel the need to remain glued there throughout the working day. In the long run, your mind and body will thank you for it.

Whether you go for a short walk to breathe some fresh air, kick back with a book in the break room, or simply indulge in some “waking rest,” every little bit helps. The key is to recognize that working longer does not necessarily mean working better, and you’ll actually be doing yourself a big favor by taking a little break every hour or two to recharge your mental batteries.

Communicate honestly

Open and honest communication is a vital piece of the puzzle when it comes to protecting your mental well-being in the workplace. Naturally, this goes two ways, as employers who are upfront and understanding take the stress out of office dialogues. But you can also decide to be the catalyst for direct communication and stand by this approach when it matters most.

In the face of mountainous workloads, unrealistic deadlines, or other genuine grievances surrounding your role, the best thing you can do is find a respectful and sincere way to voice your concerns and carve a path towards a more manageable and productive working day.

Clock in and out on time

Just like it’s important to take regular breaks, it’s also crucial to take your start and finish times seriously. Overworked staff are notoriously unproductive, with so-called “work martyrs” sacrificing hours of personal time in the name of reducing their workloads. Productive output drops dramatically after the 50-hour/week mark and plummets completely beyond 55 hours. Making this personal sacrifice is a serious physical and mental drain on those who make it, and, ultimately, a waste of valuable time.

Instead, clock in on time and leave on time — make the most of your contracted hours and know when to call it a day. Drawing clear dividing lines between your personal and professional lives is an essential basis for an effective work-life balance. By respecting these important boundaries, you can reap the benefits in and out of work.

Never, ever multi-task

Word is spreading throughout the working world about the dangers of multitasking, and it’s time to bust this widespread myth once and for all. Truth is, we only think we’re multitasking. It’s far more likely that we’re actually just shifting focus repeatedly between one task and another, ultimately without making much progress on either of the two outstanding jobs.

Treat yourself

Last but certainly not least, no matter what line of work you’re in, everyone deserves the gratification that comes with the occasional reward, and sometimes, it pays to be your own benefactor. Treats come in all shapes and sizes — some tangible, others abstract — but the important thing to remember is that everyone is different, and it’s about finding what gives you the emotional spring in your step that helps you get the job done.

Whether it’s indulging in a luxurious out-of-office lunch, embarking on an after-work shopping spree, or stocking up on gourmet coffee products to see you through the working day, don’t stop treating yourself. A personal reward for working at your best is the least you deserve, and these little pick-me-ups could be the secret to seeing the productivity boost you’re looking for.

Source:

https://www.topresume.com/career-advice/tips-to-balancing-work-and-life