How to Prevent Job Burnout in 3 Simple Steps

With our demanding, on-the-go lifestyles, burnout might feel inevitable. With these tips, it’s possible to avoid.

With globalization, digitalization, dual-income households, and social media, people are experiencing job burnout now more than ever.

We’re all out to achieve so much more than our ancestors did because, well, life isn’t just about survival anymore (thank goodness!). This wave of busyness and accelerated living is exciting, but it’s also causing a drained generation.

On the work front, mental health is a hot topic for organizations everywhere because it’s costing companies money. For instance, the prevalence of major depression within the workforce is estimated to cost $210 billion per year and, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), it’s the leading cause of disability worldwide. Recently, the WHO classified burnout as a legitimate medical diagnosis, characterizing it as “a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.” The ability of a doctor to diagnose a patient with burnout legitimizes the condition and underscores the seriousness of being afflicted.

Signs of job burnout can be classified as becoming overridden by any mental health issues from depression, anxiety, and stress to deeper, more complex issues. However, you don’t need to be overtaken by physical work to feel burnt out. In fact, emotional labor can cause feelings of fatigue that mimic depression.

Considering that one in five people will be affected by some form of mental health issue in their lifetime, it’s important to understand the signs of burnout and to invest in your mental wellbeing today to ensure a healthy and functional future.

1. Check yourself

Overcommitting and charging full speed ahead without minding the why behind a certain decision is probably the number one mistake people make today. Instead of following your heart’s desire, it’s quite possible that you’re one of many people who are living the life that society has dictated without stopping to consider what you want. People say “yes” all day to functions, people, tasks, and things without stopping and asking themselves what they want.

  • DON’T: Do things only because you “should” do them. Should is a dirty word.
  • DO: Practice regular check-in’s with yourself to avoid life and job burnout. Review the many areas of life. Do you feel the way you want to feel?

2. Practice self-love

It’s absolutely critical to take the time to care for yourself. There is no excuse. Self-love will be whatever you need to recharge. For me, it’s nature, quiet, and creativity. For others, it might be a night out with close friends or a long run. Do something regularly that helps you unwind and feel grounded again.

  • DON’T: Put yourself last. You cannot be a great partner/parent/teammate/relative/employee if you’re always feeling burnt out from your job.
  • DO: Practice self-love and take an inventory of your feelings: How did a certain activity make you feel?

3. Pay attention

The sooner you’re able to detect the signs of a burnout creeping up on you, the better. This perception takes emotional intelligence and the ability to be conscious of your emotions. Your body will tell you something’s wrong — you just need to listen to it. Some physical signs of job burnout include exhaustion, insomnia, irritability, loss of interest, and lack of appetite. You can stay in tune with yourself by having regular check-ins with yourself. A journal makes the process of checking in natural and can be helpful for future references. Journaling also helps with unwinding, putting things into perspective, and releasing negative feelings.

  • DON’T: Delay! Two in three people will keep their concerns about mental health to themselves for fear of being judged. Release yourself from this stigma and seek help. Chances are others have felt the same way.
  • DO: Pay attention to your heart every day. Be mindful of how you’re feeling. If you notice anything that worries you, ask a friend about it.

I mentioned before that mental health affects one in five people. You may not be exempt and that’s OK. The most important thing is to build resilience now. A healthy, strong foundation can withstand the storm. By taking care of yourself now you can be better prepared when crisis strikes — because it just might! Life has a tendency to compound on us. Sometimes when it rains, it pours, so invest in a good roof today.

If you are facing a mental-health challenge or you are experiencing signs of burnout, reach out and seek help.

Source:

https://www.topresume.com/career-advice/3-tips-to-avoid-burning-out

Workplace Wellness: 5 Ways to Mind Mental Health at Work

Take care of your mental health in the workplace.

“Productivity” is the boardroom buzzword on the lips of business owners and managers across the globe. All too often however, this results in employees being pushed to demonstrate productivity at the expense of their job satisfaction and even, in some cases, their general mental health.

Encouraging and supportive employers are crucial to a truly productive team, but any mutually beneficial relationship requires both give and take. With that in mind, here is a series of simple and effective productivity tips you can use to achieve wellness in the workplace and find a balance between mental well-being and professional performance.

Take a break

Downtime is non-negotiable when it comes to productivity. Various studies even highlight the importance of taking regular breaks, like “movement breaks,” which are designed to reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and depression. Spending long stretches of time at your desk can negatively affect your reasoning ability, your motivation, and your creativity, so don’t feel the need to remain glued there throughout the working day. In the long run, your mind and body will thank you for it.

Whether you go for a short walk to breathe some fresh air, kick back with a book in the break room, or simply indulge in some “waking rest,” every little bit helps. The key is to recognize that working longer does not necessarily mean working better, and you’ll actually be doing yourself a big favor by taking a little break every hour or two to recharge your mental batteries.

Communicate honestly

Open and honest communication is a vital piece of the puzzle when it comes to protecting your mental well-being in the workplace. Naturally, this goes two ways, as employers who are upfront and understanding take the stress out of office dialogues. But you can also decide to be the catalyst for direct communication and stand by this approach when it matters most.

In the face of mountainous workloads, unrealistic deadlines, or other genuine grievances surrounding your role, the best thing you can do is find a respectful and sincere way to voice your concerns and carve a path towards a more manageable and productive working day.

Clock in and out on time

Just like it’s important to take regular breaks, it’s also crucial to take your start and finish times seriously. Overworked staff are notoriously unproductive, with so-called “work martyrs” sacrificing hours of personal time in the name of reducing their workloads. Productive output drops dramatically after the 50-hour/week mark and plummets completely beyond 55 hours. Making this personal sacrifice is a serious physical and mental drain on those who make it, and, ultimately, a waste of valuable time.

Instead, clock in on time and leave on time — make the most of your contracted hours and know when to call it a day. Drawing clear dividing lines between your personal and professional lives is an essential basis for an effective work-life balance. By respecting these important boundaries, you can reap the benefits in and out of work.

Never, ever multi-task

Word is spreading throughout the working world about the dangers of multitasking, and it’s time to bust this widespread myth once and for all. Truth is, we only think we’re multitasking. It’s far more likely that we’re actually just shifting focus repeatedly between one task and another, ultimately without making much progress on either of the two outstanding jobs.

Treat yourself

Last but certainly not least, no matter what line of work you’re in, everyone deserves the gratification that comes with the occasional reward, and sometimes, it pays to be your own benefactor. Treats come in all shapes and sizes — some tangible, others abstract — but the important thing to remember is that everyone is different, and it’s about finding what gives you the emotional spring in your step that helps you get the job done.

Whether it’s indulging in a luxurious out-of-office lunch, embarking on an after-work shopping spree, or stocking up on gourmet coffee products to see you through the working day, don’t stop treating yourself. A personal reward for working at your best is the least you deserve, and these little pick-me-ups could be the secret to seeing the productivity boost you’re looking for.

Source:

https://www.topresume.com/career-advice/tips-to-balancing-work-and-life

7 Tips for Handling a Bully at Work

Don’t let your workplace bully win; here’s how to handle bullying at work.

Whether you’re aware or not, bullying is a common occurrence in the work arena. To explore and dig deeper into this topic, TopResume recently surveyedmore than 1,000 working professionals. The results were very telling.

Of the 1,229 respondents, only four percent said they have never felt bullied in the workplace; that means a whopping 96 percent of respondents have felt bullied at work. And, if you think bullying only comes from those in a position of power, like a manager or a boss, think again. In that same survey, 25 percent of respondents said they have felt bullied by a peer or co-worker.

Bullying can lead to health concerns, undue stress, and low productivity at work — and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. With that said, it’s important to take appropriate steps to handle bullying at work to support your well-being. Below are some suggestions to consider if you find yourself at the mercy of workplace bullying.

How to handle bullying at work

1. Check yourself

If you feel you are being bullied at work, the first thing to do is to take inventory of any ways you might be contributing to the challenging situation. It could be that you are doing nothing to provoke the bullying (which is often the case), but the point here is to truly size up the situation and take responsibility if you might be invoking the behavior in any way. From that perspective, you can determine the best way to deal with the situation.

Tip: Keep in mind that people make mistakes. Take a moment to size up the situation and determine if the “bullying” was simply a one-time incident due to someone having a bad day. If yes, then consider letting it go and moving on.

2. Take action before it has a negative impact on you

Understandably, many individuals are afraid to speak up when they are being bullied. They might be concerned about what others will think. And, if the bully is their boss or someone in a position of power, then one’s livelihood could be at stake. With that said, ongoing, long-term bullying can have a negative impact on your overall well-being, which in turn can have a negative impact on your performance and ability to do your work. Take care of yourself and develop an action plan to address the concern.

3. Tell your higher-ups or HR

If you are not comfortable speaking to the individual who is bullying you directly, then you might need to discuss it with your manager or human resources. Choose the course of action that feels best for you for your situation.

Tip: When addressing your concern with others, don’t play the blame game. Come up with a plan of how you are going to address the bullying concern and be sure to include its impact on productivity, well-being, and morale coupled with some possible solutions.

4. Don’t take it personally

This can be difficult for many, but it’s important that you don’t take bullying personally. Remember, when someone is bullying you, it’s more about them than it is about you. Often, a bully is acting from a place of insecurity and/or from a need to control. Practice having healthy emotional boundaries that keep you from reacting or feeling bad about yourself when workplace bullying occurs.

5. Address the issue head on

This won’t always be possible or comfortable, but if it is, speak up and stand your ground when communicating with a bully. In a recent Time article, Fran Hauser, author of “The Myth of the Nice Girl,” suggests using the following phrases when dealing with a work bully or someone who is not treating you appropriately:

  • “Please don’t talk to me that way.”
  • “Let’s try to get this conversation to a place where it can be productive.”
  • “Let’s take a break and come back to this later.”

6. Leave if it’s not worth it

Your well-being is most important, and without it, you’re no good to anyone. If you have done all you can to eliminate the bullying but it’s still occurring, then it might be time to explore other options. Consider opportunities in other departments or with a new company altogether.

7. Document all of it

This last bit of advice on how to handle bullying in the workplace is extremely important to remember: Always document everything as it relates to your interactions with the bully. This not only provides a timeline of events, but it also helps you recall information more easily when needed.

Tip: If a bully is attempting to make you look bad or imply you’re not doing your job, you can ask for written confirmation and details that he or she will have to own up to when questioned. In other words, attempt to communicate via email when dealing with a bully so you have a written record of the communication.

The TopResume survey results show that there is a resounding need to deal with workplace bullying. Take action to support yourself if you find yourself being impacted by a workplace bully. Also, when you speak up and take a stand for yourself, it empowers others to do the same.

Source:

https://www.topresume.com/career-advice/how-to-handle-bullying-at-work

 

5 Strategies to Deal With Financial Stress

Feelings of financial stress often stem from common issues such as carrying too much debt, not earning enough money, the expense of raising kids, marriage to a spouse that has different ideas about how to manage finances, and the list can go on.

There is a virtually endless list of reasons you may be feeling some financial stress. It can take its toll on your closest relationships, and when you are stressed it can start affecting other aspects of your life.

If you can reduce your financial worry, it will free your mind so that you can focus on other important areas of your life and relax, knowing you have a plan to handle your financial situation. Following are a few things you can do now to relieve your financial stress and make it easier to function each day.

01

 Create a Budget

Man working at laptop expressing frustration
eli_asenova/E+ / Getty Images

You may feel overwhelmed and think that a budget is only going to add to your financial stress, but it is the best tool you have to get control of your finances and stop worrying about money. A budget allows you to decide when and how you are going to spend your hard-earned dollars. This spending plan makes sure you cover your immediate expenses, while still working towards your retirement and savings goals. It can also help you find extra money to put towards debt.

The first few months of planning and sticking to a budget are the most challenging, but once you understand what to do you can often reduce the amount of time you spend on it, and in turn, reduce the amount of time you spend worrying about money. Your budget will give you the feeling of control that you need to have over your finances. Start with just one months’ worth of expenses and then go from there, tracking spending and cutting back in different areas each month until you find the perfect balance.

02

 Get an Emergency Fund

Emergency fund
sorbetto/iStock

An emergency fund is an amount of money you have set aside to cover unexpected expenses and financial emergencies. Although a car repair can be expensive and stressful, if you know you can tap into your emergency fund to cover it, a lot of the stress will go away. It is also easier to use the money in your budget the way you planned if you know you have the extra money in the bank ready to cover the unexpected emergencies that may crop up. You should have at least $1,000 in the bank until you are out of debt and after that, work up to an amount that covers about six months’ worth of your expenses.

Building an emergency fund may seem tough at first, especially if you are struggling to make ends meet each month. Start by putting a small amount, whether it’s $10 or $100, in the bank from each paycheck, and any leftover money you have in your other spending categories at the end of the month so that you can build up your emergency fund. You may also consider selling any unused items around the house to build up that cash as quickly as you can. You may be surprised at how quickly the stress fades away when you know you have that money in the bank to protect you and your family.

03

 Get Outside Help

Couple Meeting With Financial Advisor.
Miodrag Gajic / Getty Images

If you are really struggling with getting a handle on your budget and spending issues, do not be afraid to get outside help. You can take classes on basic money management and investing, that will help you plan out a budget and do the things you need to succeed financially. A financial planner can help you create a long-term saving and investing strategy that will help you take care of your current needs and plan for retirement. It is important to realize that you do not have to face the problems alone. If you are feeling overwhelmed by debt you can work with a credit counseling service to help you restructure your debt and in some cases, negotiate with creditors. You can also take financial classes that coach you through budgeting and other aspects of your personal finances.

Often, just talking to someone outside of the situation can help. Talking through your financial challenges and seeing an outside perspective can help you. Also, it can help to be accountable to someone about your progress. Just knowing that you have to report to someone else on your spending or your savings progress may be all you need to curb your impulse shopping habit or any other issues. A friend can help with this but a support group or class can also help, and sometimes be even more effective because a support group won’t let you off the hook.

04

 Determine What You Can Change

We've managed our budget so well this month
PeopleImages / Getty Images

If you are having financial issues, you may have an income issue, a spending issue, or a combination of the two. If you know that you do not make enough money to keep up with your current bills, decide what you can do to change the situation. It may include options such as going back to school to qualify for a higher paying job. If you feel you have a spending problem and it’s an addiction, you may want to attend a group like Shopaholics Anonymous to get help dealing with the issues you are facing. Once you have a plan that will help you change your situation permanently, you should be able to reduce your stress. One way that you can prioritize the things to cut back on is to determine the hourly cost of your wants. This may make choosing which items to cut much easier. Mastering these twenty financial skills can help reduce your financial stress too.

Change is not always easy. Start with small steps and work up to bigger changes. Additionally, if you make a mistake one week, go easy on yourself, and get right back on track so you can continue to stick to your budget and keep working on making those changes in your financial habits. It helps to realize that it’s a journey and even if you take a short detour or a small break, you can keep moving forward and make the necessary changes.

05

 Find Positive Aspects of Your Life Each Day

Couple going over finances
BURGER / Getty Images

While this may sound like it’s not a solution to your financial problem, it can make a big difference in the amount of stress you feel each day. Find positive aspects of your financial situation by tracking your progress towards your financial goals. Looking at the positive aspects of your life each day can also help you reduce your stress.

If possible, try to find some healthy outlets that do not cost a lot of money. Regular exercise and taking care of yourself can reduce your overall feelings of stress, which allows you to better focus on the problems and make headway. You can change your financial situation, and you will find it easier to accomplish if you are not worried and living in an anxious state all of the time.

Source:

https://www.thebalance.com/dealing-with-financial-stress-2385957

Top 7 Tips for How to Be Happy

Here are our top tips for how to find true and lasting happiness in daily life:

1. Let go of negativity.

  • Learn to forgive and forget.

  • See every challenge as an opportunity for further growth.

  • Express gratitude for what you have.

  • Be more optimistic about the future and your ability to accomplish life goals.

  • Open yourself up to success and embrace failures or mistakes that happen along the way.

  • Know that none of us are perfect, we are all here to entertain and be entertained.

  • Don’t worry about the little things. Take plenty of “worry vacations” where you train your mind not to worry for a certain lengths of time.

  • If you want to be more positive, surround yourself with positive energy and people. Nurture the positive relationships that you have, seeking out more of those relationships that help uplift you.

  • Accept and love yourself for the unique gifts and talents that you bring to life. Spend less time trying to please others and spend more time trying to please your higher self.

  • See the humor in life and in our experiences. Take life less seriously and learn to laugh at yourself.

2. Serve and be kind to others.

  • Treat everyone with kindness. Not only does it help others to feel better, but you will notice that you too feel good after having a positive interaction with others.

  • Speak well of others. When you speak negatively of others you will attract more negativity to yourself, but when you speak positively of others, you will attract more positivity.

  • Truly listen to others. Be present and mindful to what others are really saying when they speak. Support them without bringing yourself into it.

  • Be careful with your words. Speak gentler, kinder, and wiser.

  • Respect others and their free will.

  • Put your trust in others and be trusted in return. Enjoy the sense of community and friendship that comes from this openness and faith in one another.

  • Work as part of a whole. See others as partners in your efforts. Unite your efforts with them to create a synergy more powerful than anything you could do alone.

  • Practice generosity and giving without expecting anything in return. Get involved with service opportunities and offer what you can to a greater cause.

  • Smile more– to family, to co-workers, to neighbors, to strangers– and watch it not only change how you feel but also how they feel too.

3. Live in the present.

  • Don’t replay negative events or worry about the future.

  • Accept and celebrate impermanence. Be grateful for your life, for each moment of every day. Observe the constant and natural flow of change that surrounds us, and your small yet important part of the natural, divine flow of life.

  • Observe yourself in the moment. Work on your reactions to outer circumstances and learn how to approach life harmoniously.

4. Choose a healthy lifestyle.

  • Keep a daily routine. Wake up at the same time every morning, preferably early. Setting yourself to a natural biorhythm will make it easier to wake up and feel energized.

  • Get enough sleep. Proper sleep is linked to positive personality characteristics like optimism, improved self-esteem, and even problem-solving.

  • Expose yourself to cold temperatures (especially first thing in the morning with perhaps a cold shower). It increases your circulation, helps minimize inflammation in the body, enhances weight loss, and energizes and invigorates you to start your day.

  • Turn off the TV. For every hour of TV you watch, you reduce 22 minutes of your life expectancy.

  • Eat properly. What you eat has a direct effect on your mood and energy levels. Eat plenty of organic, locally grown fruits and vegetables, nuts, whole grains, and dairy products that are both vitamin and mineral-infused. Don’t overeat and try to practice healthy self-control.

  • Exercise daily to the point of sweating. It not only helps to purify the body, but also releases endorphins which help to prevent stress, relieve depression, and positively improve your mood.

  • Laugh more. Laughter is the best medicine. Like exercise, it releases endorphins that battle the negative effects of stress and promote a sense of well-being and joy.

  • Practice deep breathing and yoga. The body and mind are connected. Emotions affect the physical systems in the body, and the state of the body also affects the mind. By relaxing and releasing tension through the breath or yoga practice you feel calmer and centered throughout the day.

5. Take care of your spirit.

  • Strive to always learn new things. Constantly expand your awareness and discover new ways of expressing your divine gifts.

  • Get creative. This will not only challenge you to learn new things but will also help to keep your mind in a positive place. Practice living in the present moment and being a channel for the divine flow of creativity.

  • Practice meditation. Research has proven that even as little as 10 minutes of meditation a day can lead to physical changes in the brain that improve concentration and focus, calm the nervous system, and help you to become more kind and compassionate, and even more humorous. Then bring the joy and peace you receive from meditation into your daily life and activity.

  • Be honest. Telling the truth keeps you free inside, builds trust in relationships, and improves your will power and the ability to attract success.

  • Surrender to the Universe Divine and allow it to take care of the littlest things in life to the greatest and most important.

6. Be inwardly free.

  • Live minimally and simply. Often extravagant living brings more stress, not more satisfaction.

  • De-clutter your home to de-clutter your mind. Clutter is an often unrecognized source of stress that promotes feelings of anxiety, frustration, distraction, and guilt. Feel good in your own home. Make it your sanctuary by keeping it clean, organized, and uplifting.

  • Go without certain things you think you need. Travel to new places where not everything is as easily accessible or readily available, and learn to appreciate what you have by expanding your world.

  • Take some time away from life’s complicated outer involvements to get to know your family, your neighbors, and your loved ones better; and to get to know yourself.

7.  Reconnect with Nature.

  • Take some time every week to recharge your body battery. On the weekend, escape to nature or a place where you can feel peace in time for a fresh start to the workweek.

  • Get outside whenever possible to breathe in the fresh air and feel the sunshine. Both of which studies have shown to have a positive effect on our health and our mood.

  • Take some time to be silent. Be silent and calm every night for at least 10 minutes (longer if possible) and again in the morning before rising. This will produce an unbreakable habit of inner happiness to help you meet challenges in life.

  • Observe the natural beauty that surrounds you and feel a sense of connection. Appreciate the details and miracles that can be found in nature.

Taking the Next Steps to Finding Happiness:

Ask yourself what makes you happy, and find ways to restructure your life so that you are able to do more of those things.

Then ask why you struggle to do the things that you know will make you happy. Why are you not yet happy? Why haven’t you taken the next steps to find your happiness? Why are you here? And what do you need to do to feel a sense of accomplishment in this life?

Visualize yourself happy, doing the things that will bring you inner and outer success in life and write down the things you need to do to create a Happiness Bucket List. Start with the little things you know you can do each day that will bring you joy. Then move on to accomplish greater and greater things on your happiness bucket list.

Source:

Top 7 Tips for How to Be Happy

Got Anxiety? here’s How to use your senses to calm your mind and body

Hey! So I’m sharing this because if you are, like most grown-ups, then you experience (hopefully not often) the dreadful take over of anxiety. I’ll admit, I’ve been feeling the pressure lately.

Whether it’s work, finances or even will I get Johnny to soccer practice on time, anxiety is all around us every day. My son actually told me about this technique of simply taking that “you moment” while using your senses to provide a calmness to your mind & body.

As a lover of finding peace in nature and calm surroundings I really like it.

Life is life, and stress is inevitable so instead of trying to eliminate what you sometimes can’t I say let’s find ways to get in touch with ourselves and overcome it gracefully & mindfully.

Share your thoughts on this exercise. Has anyone tried this?

Meditation Basics: The 5 Senses

The five senses – Hearing, Seeing, Smelling, Touching, and Tasting – represent our earliest sensory experiences in the world. Yet how often do we really pay attention to what these critical pathways are telling us?

More often than not, we allow them to become dulled by the constant distractions present in modern life. We forget how powerful our senses are, and we lose touch with the ability to fully perceive the wholeness of our existence.

Therefore, the five senses can be a great focal point for basic meditation practice, or as a warm-up before any more traditional meditation.

You may want to begin in a sitting position, close your eyes, take a few deep breaths (five sounds like a good number, doesn’t it?), and begin gently – calling to attention each sensory window, going one experience at a time.

outside

Listen – let the sound of your environment (or lack of sound) call you to the present moment. Let each moment’s passing reveal some new element you may not have ordinarily noticed. Reflect, breathe, and move forward.

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Look – open your eyes and carefully note the colors, shapes and textures that surround you. What areas of movement or areas of stillness attract the eye? Reflect, breathe, and move forward.

outside3

Smell – close your eyes again and breathe in through your nose, absorbing fully the scent of your surroundings. Observe which sensations feel like natural smells and artificial smells. Reflect, breathe, and move forward.

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Touch – you can hold a small object such as a stone or meditation mala, or you can simply reach forward and touch the earth. Let the feeling of “touching” tether you to the environment, connecting you with the physical reality of your existence. Reflect, breathe, and move forward.

outside5

Taste – whether you taste, air, water, an item of food, or the back of your hand – find a way to awaken the most intimate sense, and observe how the experience gives insight into the inner portion of your being. Reflect, breathe, and move forward.

By frequently calling to attention and sharpening the senses before and during meditation, we may learn to reconnect with our bodies, reconnect with the sensations of the present moment, and better understand the gift of life that we experience with each rise and fall of our breath.

Source:

Meditation Basics: The 5 Senses